Short stories and essays by Shaun Costello, as well as excerpts from manuscripts in progress.

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WILD ABOUT HARRY…..The first reviews are in!

WILD ABOUT HARRY

A friend who knew him well remembers HARRY REEMS

by Shaun Costello

 Harry - Book Cover final version

 

The reviews are coming in:

Harry 4 B&W shots_edited-1

Looking for the dirt!

on June 26, 2015
A fun and filthy read about fun and filthy guy, looking for the dirt and finding it: a story of drugs, smut, mafia, the rise to fame and coming down hard – and getting away and getting away with it. Recommended.
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A Touching Tribute by One Adult Industry Legend to Another

 By Geert Claeys on June 7, 2015

Format: Kindle Edition

My earliest memory of Golden Age hardcore he-man Harry Reems stems from somewhere back in the still budding Eighties. Our (Belgian) household was still a few years removed from acquiring its first VCR, mighty pricey back in the day, but the local video store would offer cumbersome play-only devices described as “movie boxes” (anyone else remember those contraptions ?) for an affordable weekend rental, throwing in a couple of complimentary tapes as part of the deal. As with any VHS renter, one of the flicks I picked was of an adult nature, in my case the 1974 carnal classic

Making a phone call on The Deuce could be hazardous to your health

Making a phone call on The Deuce could be hazardous to your health

Sometime Sweet Susan. So it came to pass that my mom (!!!) and I – aged about 15 or 16 at the time – sat down on a Saturday night to sample our first flavor of in-house intimate entertainment. Mom, God rest her weary soul, was a desperate housewife well before TV made the term fashionable, possessed of a tiger’s temperament trapped in the starting to sag shell of a stay at home spouse and mother of eleven, eight sons versus three daughters. The bloom of youth prematurely trampled by daily drudgery, Lord knows she could stand a salacious vicarious thrill to help her make it through the night. Turned out titular Susan, the pic’s perky protagonist, was a particularly troubled young lady with a split personality (the proverbial good girl/bad girl) in dire need of psychiatric support. Enter Harry Reems as the Good Doctor (I didn’t see Deep Throat until several years after) rushing in aid of our ailing heroine. I swear you could have heard both mom and me gasp at his first appearance. Although an amiable actor, certainly by adult standards (a frame of reference I was still unfamiliar with at the time), it was his look that did it for us. Yes, we really were that shallow ! A fine torso with magnificent muscle definition, yet light years removed from the pumped physique of the next decade’s gym bunnies, covered with a thick layer of fur as our favorite tell-tale trademark of virility. Mom liked ‘em hirsute and, then still unbeknownst to her, so did the youngest of her boys… The Sixties’ sexual

Fanny was a Puerto Rican stripper who taught young Herb everything he knew about sex

Fanny was a Puerto Rican stripper who taught young Herb everything he knew about sex

revolution had produced an unprecedented permissiveness on worldwide cinema screens by the time strapping young Herbert Streicher, a nice Jewish kid from Brooklyn, figured these newfangled fornication flicks were a great way to make ends meet while waiting for his big break in thespian territory. The ultimately short-lived “Porno Chic” phenomenon took sex films out of their storefront ghetto and moved them into fancy first run theaters. For a brief shining moment, it seemed as if carnal cinema had come of age and had permanently taken up residence in the major league to the approval of adventurous audiences everywhere. In such climate, illusory though it was to prove, it was not unthinkable for a struggling actor to seriously consider the option of taking it off and putting it in for pictorial posterity without a care as to how or whether this might affect his future chances. After all, he wasn’t doing anything that didn’t come naturally to most people. At worst, should fornication films prove but a fleeting fad, they would probably sink without a trace leaving no one the wiser, right ? Unfortunately for Herb, who had been trying on professional monikers with “Tim Long” the most persistent until “Harry Reems” finally stuck, an unassuming little XXX flick was to decide otherwise… Gerard Damiano’s groundbreaking Deep Throat and its legal hassles that were to kill off the legit careers of all involved, headed by Reems serving as primary scapegoat, have been extensively covered by Bailey and Barbato’s essential 2005 documentary Inside Deep Throat. Shaun Costello, a fellow performer from the industry’s infancy who would graduate to feature filmmaking while upholding an astonishing “Real World” front, was there at crucial junctures in Harry’s life. Now he lifts the veil on the man whose very image was to become synonymous with the prototypical Seventies porno stud : a lean mean fornicatin’ machine with the trademark

Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty were the first two Hollywood celebrities to come to Harry's aid.  Fund raisers were held in New York and Hollywood for the Harry Reems Legal Defense Fund

Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty were the first two Hollywood celebrities to come to Harry’s aid. Fund raisers were held in New York and Hollywood for the Harry Reems Legal Defense Fund

handlebar mustache. A close buddy and ally since their days in the trenches, Costello chronologically charts the rise and fall of the reluctant adult industry icon in an instantly ingratiating, flab-free style giving you the how’s and why’s without resorting to amateur analysis or purple prose. Which is not to say that he merely records the bad boy shenanigans he shared with his subject, as evidenced by an astonishingly astute account of an acid trip that reads like something akin to Beat poetry. Carnal cognoscenti are well aware that Reems starred in Costello’s fledgling filmmaking effort, the sexually explicit Vietnam vet on a rampage flick Forced Entry, and the exhaustive chapter on that film’s genesis alone provides enough reason to pick up a copy of the book. Already associated with congenially comedic capers through Throat and other farces of its ilk taking their cues from burlesque theater, the actor gave one of his most atypical performances as the deeply disturbed gas station attendant whose twisted views on morality

“I’m Marlene Willoughby. Catchy name, huh? It’s not my real name, of course. I’m Polish. You probably couldn’t even pronounce it.”

(punishing women for making themselves sexually available to all and sundry) blow up in his face when the tables are turned in deliciously ironic fashion. Although Reems was to subsequently feign shock at the movie’s heady mix of real sex and phoney violence in his 1975 autobiography Here Comes Harry Reems !, it remains one of his standout achievements, providing a strong glimpse of what might have been had mainstream movies embraced rather than rebuffed him. Costello chronicles Reems’s fall from grace in harrowing detail, deftly side-stepping sensationalism at every turn. The actor’s own words quoted from various credited sources paper over the periods when the longtime pals’ paths would diverge. Their fleeting reunion towards decade’s end, when Costello was on his way up with bigger budgets allowing for more ambitious endeavors (the “Warren Evans” era, for those in the know) and Reems was fighting an ever escalating alcohol addiction in order to cope with the mounting frustration over his erotic entrapment, yields one of the book’s most poignant passages guaranteed to break a reader’s heart. Had the author ended right there and then, he would have wound up with one hell of a cautionary tale. Thankfully, life rarely comes as cut ’n dried as your average Movie of the Week would have it and Harry Reems ultimately did have a “life after porn”, finding both God and true love as well as widespread acceptance by his small town community in the unexpectedly enlightened State of Utah. Of all the lavish illustrations, mostly candid movie stills and eye-popping poster art, one stands out in particular. It’s a teeny tiny snap shot of Harry and his wife Jeannie Sterrett at the Inside Deep Throat premiere. Even the usually unsentimental Costello goes on record to concede that this apparently unassuming lady did nothing less than save his life. Moving back to where I started from, my mom never wished ill on anybody, not anybody who didn’t deserve it anyway, certainly no past or present object of her cinematic affection, secret sex fantasies or whatever the case may have been. Knowing her as well as I did, I’ve got a pretty good hunch she would have been tickled pink to learn that this lovely hunk o’man who stirred her loins many decades ago finally found happiness and got to lead a good life before his untimely passing at the age of 65. Makes me kinda happy as well, truth be told… Dries Vermeulen a/k/a the former (and future ?) Dirty Movie Devotee temporarily trapped in Limbo

DEEP THROAT became such a box office phenomenon that the Religious Right came out in force to demonstrate across the country

DEEP THROAT became such a box office phenomenon that the Religious Right came out in force to demonstrate across the country

“Shaun Costello has written as beautiful a tribute as anyone could imagine. A fantastic evocation of a time, of a place and – most of all – of a friendship.”

by Julian Marsh on June 1, 2015

From The Erotic Film Society in London

For such a prolific director – at least 66 films between 1973 and 1984 – Shaun Costello remained one of the New York XXX scene’s best kept secrets for many years. One reason is the number of noms-de-porn he worked under. He made more than his fair share of films that are now recognized as classics but not always under the same name – he was ‘Kenneth Schwartz’ for FIONA ON FIRE but ‘Warren Evans’ for DRACULA EXOTICA, for example – and this prevented him from getting due recognition until relatively recently. For notorious roughies FORCED ENTRY and WATERPOWER, he was ‘Helmuth Richler’ but ‘Amanda Barton’ made the sensitive PASSIONS OF CAROL. At Avon Productions he was ‘Russ Carlson’ and for a while he was even ‘Oscar Tripe'; plus there were numerous uncredited one-day-wonders.

In ONLY THE BEST, published at the dawn of the video era, critic Jim Holliday indicated that one person was behind some of these pseudonyms; but pre-internet it was pretty much impossible for even dedicated pornologists to crack the Costello code.

A slushy night on

A slushy night on “The Deuce”

With the advent of the web, the IMDb and IAFD and dedicated discussion forums where smut-hounds could compare what they’d discovered, facts began to surface.

Then something occurred that every film historian dreams about; Shaun Costello himself joined the forums. He posted on IMDb. He corrected. He clarified…

And suddenly his incredible career came into sharp focus. Not just those 66 films that he helmed but around the same number of appearances from 1971 to ’89 – and that doesn’t include loops – plus at least 50 films he produced and a similar number of writing credits. It’s a wonder he ever found time to sleep.

On the evidence of WILD ABOUT HARRY, his by turns hilarious and moving memoir about his friendship with Harry Reems, during the pre-DEEP THROAT days of Big Apple hard-core, sleep was often the last thing on his mind. Whether he was editing into the early hours – the only way he could afford post-production facilities – or heroically carousing with his buddies – ‘the Three Musketeers of 42nd Street’ – those years in the late 60s and early 70s seem to have been one madcap adventure, where anything was possible.

A voracious film fan, from art-house masters to grindhouse smut, Shaun absorbed everything. He fell into the pornographic loops business by happy accident, just as they were on the borderline of becoming legal, or at least tolerated, in the adult bookstores of the Deuce.

Herb and Jamie. Gone now, but not forgotten.

Herb and Jamie. Gone now, but not forgotten.

And he was there when a handsome, young, legit actor – still known by his birth name, Herb Streicher – made his debut in an explicit 8mm film destined for ‘under the counter’ sales.

(Assumed names were cast aside faster than underwear: Herb wouldn’t settle on Harry Reems for a couple of years, after he’d tried on ‘Tim Long’ among other aliases.)

It wasn’t just the start of a professional relationship – Shaun cast Herb/Harry as a disturbed Vietnam Vet in FORCED ENTRY, his first feature as director – it was the beginning of a deep friendship.

And now Shaun has published this memoir of those heady days – and that double entendre is very much intended – as a tribute to his buddy, who passed away in March of this year. Anyone who knows the recipe for Automat Soup (a container of ketchup and hot water, if you’re asking – gourmets break some gratis crackers on top to simulate croutons) will probably already have a copy.

But what if you’re not a dedicated devotee of the Deuce and are wondering whether to purchase? Or what if you – horror – have to ask, ‘What’s the Deuce’? Well, let Mr Costello explain…

“The Deuce” at night.

‘The Times Square subway station, my portal to the neighborhood, was an intense assault on the senses. A sudden, almost overwhelming surge of smells and filth hit you as the train doors slid open to the rush of urine, and cotton candy, and damp humanity, and hot dogs on their revolving spits, and vomit, and baked goods like crumb cakes and bran muffins and pretzels, and the garlicky pungent scent of Gyros slowly rotating, and everything suddenly interrupted by someone chasing a pick-pocket through outstretched hands asking for dimes, and a tidal swarm of the disenfranchised huddled in groups, trying to stay warm. And this entire sensory phantasmagoria was musically scored by the overmodulated sound of Kool and the Gang wailing “Jungle Boogie” from the cheap speakers over the door to the subterranean record store. And then the cold again as you climbed the stairs to the street, and there it was, “The Deuce”.’ (from WILD ABOUT HARRY © 2015 Shaun Costello)

From this vivid evocation of arriving at 42nd Street, you should immediately have discerned that our guide to all this decadence has a very neat turn of phrase indeed, which he puts to fine effect throughout the book. It’s prose that encapsulates the sights, the sounds, the smells, the animal excitement of the city – and the only reason not to enjoy it is that it makes you break down and cry, lamenting the passing of such delightful debauchery. ‘Delightful debauchery’? Well, yes. Shaun Costello is aware of the oxymoron. On the one hand, he’s a cultured chap, dating a wealthy heiress. On the other, he’s working his way up the porn ladder. And he’s having fun all the way, along with his lifelong friend Jimmy and – of course – Harry, who is seemingly ever ready for an adventure.

Harry as a homocidal Vietnam Vet on a murder spree in FORCED ENTRY

Harry as a homocidal Vietnam Vet on a murder spree in FORCED ENTRY

Such as one hallucinogen-fuelled romp which takes them from Times Square to the East Side via various apartments whose inhabitants are woken at unearthly hours, before disgorging them on a pitch-and-putt golf course by the beach… all described with a panache that matches Hunter S Thompson’s knack for conveying altered reality.

When DEEP THROAT made Harry a porno chic superstar, his world suddenly became a round of press and promotion and personal appearances, followed equally swiftly by the traumas of the authorities’ attempts to prosecute him for merely appearing in the film. During this period, Shaun lost contact with his buddy, so he has to rely on the interviews that Harry made when he reappeared from anonymity (he’d become a real estate salesman in Colorado) in the wake of the documentary INSIDE DEEP THROAT, to describe what happened.

Initially I was worried that this could turn into a cut and paste job, but Costello has chosen and edited the quotes with great sensitivity. It’s rather like that moment in a jazz number, when the star soloist comes forward. We’ve enjoyed Shaun talking about his friend and now we get hear Harry’s own voice. And what a lovely voice it is, especially talking about his conversion to Christianity and the spiritual belief that saved him from alcoholism (with the aid of a 12 step programme). This sort of tale could so easily be preachy. And how often have former porners turned on the business, their former friends, their whole past life, when they found God?

But Harry – or Herb – was clearly such a sweet guy – and his story of salvation comes over as so genuine – that even if you don’t believe yourself, you can’t help but feel glad that he found that faith because it saved his life.

And then there’s a coda: a meeting years later; a final phone call. It’s deeply touching and heartfelt. Shaun Costello has written as beautiful a tribute as anyone could imagine.

Any quibbles? Just one. I was left ravenous for more of Shaun’s own autobiography. From his contributions to various forums, I know he has great tales to tell and that he tells them in an exceptionally entertaining manner. I hope that further memoirs will be forthcoming from this fine raconteur, drawing on about his raunchy history.

Harry on the golf course during his happy years in Utah.

Harry on the golf course during his happy years in Utah.

But that is not the aim of WILD ABOUT HARRY. It’s not a long book but it’s an intensely warm and wonderful one.  A fantastic evocation or a time, of a place and – most of all – of a friendship.

Julian Marsh

The Erotic Film Society

It gets wild, all right!

By Robin Bougie on June 1, 2015

Format: Kindle Edition

Very worthwhile look at the life and times of 1970s and 80s porn performer, Harry Reems by director Shaun Costello. If you’ve read any number of Shaun’s elaborate blog posts about his experiences working in adult films back in the day, you know that he’s got a flair for storytelling — crafting very readable tales from his memories of being in the XXX trenches. The man has lived some crazy stuff amongst some amazing personalities, and lived to tell the tale! Here, he focuses on his intimate run-ins, on-set adventures, and informed opinions with and about Mr Reems — the famous co-star of Linda Lovelace in DEEP THROAT. There are some good photos and such as well, but the real draw here is the text. The story about the making of the infamous “roughie” porno FORCED ENTRY alone is worth the price of admission. A real “must” for those who have an interest in vintage adult filmmaking, and for those who want to know more.

Praying for salvation in the land of smut.

Praying for salvation in the land of smut.

A MAJOR WOW!

By Jeff Eagle on June 1, 2015

Format: Kindle Edition

Shaun Costello’s story about Harry Reems had me at page one. Even if you didn’t know Harry you will feel as if you did. Shaun crafts a memoir that brings the Golden Age of adult films to an outrageous and hilarious story between two friends and the deliciously demented people they ran with. The stories are so well written you will feel as if you were there… or wish you were. It’s a great read about some great guys in a great era. You won’t be able to put it down.

THE FLEET'S IN....Sailors on shore leave head directly to

THE FLEET’S IN….Sailors on shore leave head directly to “The Deuce”

Great writing about a time and place almost forgotten by many!

 By Elizabeth Main on May 29, 2015

Format: Kindle Edition

I was so happy to come across this book, I loved it. A time and place that only the writer could bring to life the way he did. Completely held my interest with every word. I love the way the writer explained their relationship along with the character development. A real page turner, great fun summer read, could not put it down.

JOE'S FRIENDLY SERVICE...The location used for an early Harry Reems film FORCED ENTRY.

JOE’S FRIENDLY SERVICE…The location used for an early Harry Reems film FORCED ENTRY.

More reviews will be added as they appear on Amazon.

HERE IS A LINK TO THE BOOK’S AMAZON PAGE:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00YG1DM1I

WILD ABOUT HARRY

HE WAS A DECADE’S DARLING….AND ITS VICTIM

Harry 4 B&W shots_edited-1 

FINALLY AVAILABLE WORLDWIDE

 

WILD ABOUT HARRY

A Friend who knew him well remembers HARRY REEMS

 

Harry - Book Cover final version

by Shaun Costello

 

He was born Herbert Streicher, on August 27, 1947 to a Jewish family in Brooklyn – and died Harry Reems, on March 19, 2013, a converted Christian, at a VA Hospice in Salt Lake City, Utah. The cause of death was pancreatic cancer. Herb and Harry. A dichotomy he leaves behind for the rest of us to puzzle over. As Herb he was a son, a brother, A Bar Mitzvah boy, a High School track star, a student, a Marine, an aspiring actor, and a loyal and generous friend. As Harry he was a porn icon, and international celebrity, a darling of the TV talk show circuit, a victim of judicial overreach, a convicted felon, a finally-absolved and victorious defendant, a drunk, a drug addict, a 12 step champion, a converted Christian, a successful real estate executive, a scratch golfer, a semi-pro skier, a loving husband, and, at long last, a happy man.

Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty were the first two Hollywood celebrities to come to Harry's aid.  Fund raisers were held in New York and Hollywood for the Harry Reems Legal Defense Fund

Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty were the first two Hollywood celebrities to come to Harry’s aid. Fund raisers were held in New York and Hollywood for the Harry Reems Legal Defense Fund

Before the media circus that surrounded the exhibition, and subsequent prosecution of the movie known as Deep throat, Herb was a good friend of mine. This book is a personal remembrance of an old friend, and the only actor ever prosecuted by the United States Justice Department for simply doing his job. I’m quite happy with the way this story turned out, and I’m quite certain that Herb would feel the same.
I have included almost a hundred color and black and white photographs of Harry Reems, and of Times Square in its pre-clean up days during the 1970’s.

Making a phone call on The Deuce could be hazardous to your health

Making a phone call on The Deuce could be hazardous to your health

This book is a love letter to an old and dear friend, and to the era and environment that spawned his legend.

DEEP THROAT became such a box office phenomenon that the Religious Right came out in force to demonstrate across the country

DEEP THROAT became such a box office phenomenon that the Religious Right came out in force to demonstrate across the country

NOW AVAILABLE WORLDWIDE

THROUGH AMAZON/KINDLE

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00YG1DM1I 

AL’S WAR

AL’S WAR

The picture story of one man’s triumph over 

the juggernaut of the Japanese Empire’s military

machine during World War II

by Shaun Costello

Lt. Al, resplendent in his custom tailored Army duds from Saks Fifth Avenue. Portrait taken in New York in late 1943, before he shipped out to the Pacific to take on Tojo.

Lt. Al, resplendent in his custom tailored Army duds from Saks Fifth Avenue. Portrait taken in New York in late 1943, before he shipped out to the Pacific to take on Tojo.

In 1943, as the beastly hordes of the Japanese Empire marched triumphantly across the vast Pacific, devouring island after island, dancing the hideous gavotte of war, carving a swath of total destruction, moving ever closer to a cowered and frightened America, whose helpless West Coast surely awaited a pitiful fate, one man alone stood in the path of this dastardly aggression. One man, stalwart and proud, threw himself in harm’s way, disregarding the certain danger, ready to save an America brought to her noble knees by the savage onslaught of the yellow menace. One man, strong and unafraid, stood ready to spit in the face of the swarthy Tojo. One man –Champion of liberty, Defender of the American way, and friend of the working girl. One man – Lieutenant Al, the pride of the Army Signal Corps. This album is the picture story of that one man’s triumphant defense of America, singlehandedly pushing those squinty-eyed, buck-toothed yellow bellies back across that same Pacific, back to their jaundiced little islands, to wallow in the raw fish and Geisha culture of their questionable ancestors. One man. Our man. My father. Lieutenant Al.
A Farewell party at New York's Stork Club. My mother, father, Aunt Alice and Uncle Tommy

A Farewell party at New York’s Stork Club. My mother, father, Aunt Alice and Uncle Tommy – late 1943.

Lt. Al, before shipping out. Taken in the Bronx - late 1943.

Lt. Al, before shipping out. Taken in the Bronx – late 1943.

Lt. Al arrives in Papua New Guinea, ready to rumble.

Lt. Al arrives in Papua New Guinea, ready to rumble.

Lt. Al tells his army buddy, "My gun's bigger than yours. I wonder what else they compared.

Lt. Al tells his army buddy, “My gun’s bigger than yours.” I wonder what else they compared.

OUT OF BEER, Lt. Al explores the alternatives.

OUT OF BEER, Lt. Al explores the alternatives.

Before Officer's Training School Lt, Al was just a Private - (Nice haircut) In Basic training at Camp Crowder, Missouri.

Before Officer’s Training School Lt, Al was just a Private – (Nice haircut) In Basic training at Camp Crowder, Missouri.

FISH FOR DINNER - Lt. Al shows off his catch. Papua New Guinea 1944

FISH FOR DINNER – Lt. Al shows off his catch. Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al in the Radio Room - Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al in the Radio Room – Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al - A man and his Bazooka. Papua New Guinea - 1944

Lt. Al – A man and his Bazooka. Papua New Guinea – 1944

Lt. Al knocking back a few cold ones with his Signal Corps buddies. Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al knocking back a few cold ones with his Signal Corps buddies. Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt.Al sitting on his Jeep. Planning his next move against the Japs. Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt.Al sitting on his Jeep. Planning his next move against the Japs. Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al buys pornographic wood carvings from naked cannibals.

Lt. Al buys pornographic wood carvings from naked cannibals.

The mail plane brings pics of little Shaun.

The mail plane brings pics of little Shaun.

A C46 in the sky over New Guinea. Probably bringing photographs in the mail of little Shaun.

A C46 in the sky over New Guinea. Probably bringing photographs in the mail of little Shaun.

Lt. Al and the boys lining up to meet the mail plane. Maybe there will be pictures from home. New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al and the boys lining up to meet the mail plane. Maybe there will be pictures from home. New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al with his native pals. Papua New Guinea - 1944

Lt. Al with his native pals. Papua New Guinea – 1944

Lt. Al looking like he needs a cold one. New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al looking like he needs a cold one. New Guinea 1944

BEER DELIVERY MAKES FOR HAPPY SOLDIERS. Lt. Al and his signal Corps buddies enjoying a few.

BEER DELIVERY MAKES FOR HAPPY SOLDIERS.
Lt. Al and his signal Corps buddies enjoying a few.

A happy Lt. Al gets the news. He's going to the Philippines to tangle with Tojo. New Guinea 1944

A happy Lt. Al gets the news. He’s going to the Philippines to tangle with Tojo. New Guinea 1944

Papuan native vist Lt. Al's tent. This was the first time their picture had been taken. New Guinea 1944

Papuan native visit Lt. Al’s tent. This was the first time their picture had been taken. New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al looking like he needs some R&R. Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al looking like he needs some R&R. Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al in the Radio Room listening to the ball scores.

Lt. Al in the Radio Room listening to the ball scores.

THE STORK CLUB - Lt. Al and his pals enjoy the tropical night life. Papua New Guinea

THE STORK CLUB – Lt. Al and his pals enjoy the tropical night life. Papua New Guinea

HERSHEY BAR DIPLOMACY - The native line up for snacks from Lt. Al and his pals. Papua New Guinea 1944

HERSHEY BAR DIPLOMACY – The natives line up for snacks from Lt. Al and his pals. Papua New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al and his buddies getting ready to move on to the Philippines.

Lt. Al and his buddies getting ready to move on to the Philippines.

Lt. Al photographing the Hospital Ship. New Guinea 1944

Lt. Al photographing the Hospital Ship. New Guinea 1944

GOOD MORNING NEW GUINEA - Armed Forced Radio - Papua New Guinea 1944

GOOD MORNING NEW GUINEA – Armed Forced Radio – Papua New Guinea 1944

On board ship heading to the Philippines, Lt. Al catches some rays.

On board ship heading to the Philippines, Lt. Al catches some rays.

On the way to the Philippines, Lt. Al snaps a few pictures.The swarthy Japs are out there somewhere,

On the way to the Philippines, Lt. Al snaps a few pictures.The swarthy Japs are out there somewhere,

CHRISTMAS 1944 - Lt. Al gets a Christmas Card.

CHRISTMAS 1944 – Lt. Al gets a Christmas Card.

LOOK OUT TOJO - Lt. Al and his pals kick the Jap hordes out of the Philippines.

LOOK OUT TOJO – Lt. Al and his pals kick the Jap hordes out of the Philippines.

BODACIOUS TATA'S BOUGAINVILLE STYLE - Lt. Al is delighted to find topless natives. Bougainville - Early 1945

BODACIOUS TATA’S BOUGAINVILLE STYLE – Lt. Al is delighted to find topless natives. Bougainville – Early 1945

Bullet scarred monument - Manila Philippines 1945

Bullet scarred monument – Manila Philippines 1945

DOWNTOWN MANILA After Lt. Al kicked those Japs the hell out of there.

DOWNTOWN MANILA After Lt. Al kicked those Japs the hell out of there.

USO Dance in Manila Philippines. That's Lt. Al on the far left.

USO Dance in Manila Philippines. That’s Lt. Al on the far left.

P51's lined up and ready to rumble. Outside Manila Philippines 1945

P51’s lined up and ready to rumble. Outside Manila Philippines 1945

PHILIPPINO FOLLIES. Local band entertains the Americans. Manila Philippines 1945

PHILIPPINO FOLLIES. Local band entertains the Americans. Manila Philippines 1945

SAILORS GALORE - The Navy boys secure their landing craft - Leyte Philippines 1945

SAILORS GALORE – The Navy boys secure their landing craft – Leyte Philippines 1945

SHOWTIME USO band helps the troops celebrate the JAPANESE SURRENDER. Manila Philippines 1945

SHOWTIME USO band helps the troops celebrate the JAPANESE SURRENDER. Manila Philippines 1945

Lt. Al joins the occupation forses in Honshu Japan. Here he is having his first Geisha experience. - Occupied Japan 1945

Lt. Al joins the occupation forses in Honshu Japan. Here he is having his first Geisha experience. – Occupied Japan 1945

Lt. Al is getting to like this Geisha thing - Occupied Japan 1945

Lt. Al is getting to like this Geisha thing – Occupied Japan 1945

Lt. Al and his buddies remove their shoes before entering a Japanese Tea Room - Occupied Japan 1945

Lt. Al and his buddies remove their shoes before entering a Japanese Tea Room – Occupied Japan 1945

Lt. Al flexing his muscles after beating up on Tojo and his boys - Occupied Japan 1945

Lt. Al flexing his muscles after beating up on Tojo and his boys – Occupied Japan 1945

THANKS OF A GRATEFUL PRESIDENT - After single handedly laying the whup on the Empire of the Sun, Lt. Al accepts the gratitude of the Commander in Chief.

THANKS OF A GRATEFUL PRESIDENT – After single handedly laying the whup on the Empire of the Sun, Lt. Al accepts the gratitude of the Commander in Chief.

The boys in the Pacific carried family pics with them. Lt. Al was no exception. Yep, that's me in the middle.

The boys in the Pacific carried family pics with them. Lt. Al was no exception. Yep, that’s me in the middle. Time to head home.

BUGS – The illness that ended my career

This story was written in 1994 while I was recuperating at my sister’s house in East Hampton.

The writing style is rough and pathetically stylistic. I had not yet learned to write, so please forgive

attempts at cuteness and all of the spelling and grammatical mistakes. I wrote this longhand and

typed it on my sister’s portable Olivetti. Rough indeed, bit I think it’s an important story because it

documents the illness from which I never fully recovered, and which ended my career as a film

director. If any of you ever wondered how, after all the success I experienced, I wound up broke,

the answer is in this story.

BUGS

The illness that ended my career

by Shaun Costello

This photograph was taken at Giza during the First Gulf War. I was on location, making a film about the war for Time Magazine.

This photograph was taken at Giza during the First Gulf War. I was on location, making a film about the war for Time Magazine. A happy time indeed.

This is a link to the film WRITING FOR TIME

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6iohEAsaK0 …

I first visited Time Inc., as it then was, in the Spring of ’88. I met

Kelly Knauer, Claudia Brown, and sane others. They seemed very enthusiastic

about what I showed them. I had developed a technique, not quite

perfected, for using small format video and manipulating the molecules

until the picture had an urgent, exciting look. Kelly kept me in his office

most of the afternoon and introduced me to several Time Inkers, all of

whom seemed thrilled about my work. Kelly has no project now, but as soon

as he does hey, sounds good to me.

Meanwhile the advertising world discovers my “look” and I become sort of

popular. Do some work, make some money.

Although busy, I keep Time Inc. on my ” every two months you get a call

whether you need it or not” list. After many phone calls, in the summer

of ’90, Claudia Brown tells me about this guy, Peter Viola, whose got a

video project. So I call. So I visit.

He likes my stuff, but he’s nervous. He wants to know about 8mm video and

why I like to use it. So I make my “small format video speech”. Something

he’s heard countless times since, ad nauseum I’m afraid. But hey, I’m

consistent.

I tell him about the smallness, the lightness of the camera. How I can hold

it for long periods of time, waiting for a shot to happen. How the camera

doesn’t intimidate people, so you can get past the natural resistance in an

interview a lot faster. How I can let the tape roll, while I wait for a

magic moment t happen. How the smallness of the crew makes for a more

intimate shooting atmosphere. He asks about the cost difference. Good

question. I tell him that money should not be the issue, not the way I

shoot. I tell him that whether he chooses to shoot in 16mm film, Betacam,

or small format video, the issue should not be which costs less, but

instead, which format will capture the images he wants.

I had never used small format video because it was cheaper. I had been

fortunate to work for advertising agencies, as well as corporate clients

who went for the look and feel of what I did,as a deciding factor in

hiring me. Not the cost. I got them more, I didn’t cost them less.

So he hires me. But not before I give him the same five answers to five

thousand more questions. “Jesus”, I think to myself, “this guy is really

nervous.” I remember him sitting on a spare desk, in a hallway, outside his

old office on the eleventh floor in the Time-Life building, telling me

“Shaun do you realize that a week from now we could be in Egypt?” EGYPT!?1?

Christ, I didn’t have a check yet. I couldn’t be in Great Neck.

PETER MAKEADECISION

So, he hires me. Not because I’ll save him money, but because I’ll get him

what he wants. He hires me because I have a passion for what I do. He

hires me because I leave a little bit of myself on every frame I shoot.

It’s not so easy, this small format stuff.

The cameras are always trying to protect themselves, so you have to constantly

fool them into allowing you to get the shot you want. I can remember Janice

Simpson, a Time reporter, interviewing a man in Brooklyn, who had been

mugged seven times. It was the most I struggled with the small format

technology during this project. The aperture kept shutting down. I kept

fooling it into opening back up. The focus shifted. So, I fooled it into

shifting back. Oops, there goes the aperture again. Meanwhile, what is she

saying? Do her eyes sparkle? Do I believe her? Oops, there goes the

aperture again.

It’s not so easy, this small format stuff.

I can not look through a lens without trying to make some magic happen. It’s

both my joy and my curse. Magic doesn’t happen by pointing a camera and

turning it on. Magic happens through struggle and sweat and doing battle

with the visual elements involved, until you’ve sorted them out to the point

where they tell the story that you origionally conceived when you first

looked through the lens. I cannot help but go through this process every

time I push the button. This is why I’m so exhausted after I work. This is

why he hired me.

We shoot the job. We travel. We get along. We see things we havn’t seen

before. We have fun. Peter turns out to be a great client, mainly during

the edit. He protects me from the suits. He lets me tell Time Magazine’s

story my way. I look at the footage, like I always do, I struggle with

the story I’m trying to tell, like I always do. .WHERESTHESTORY, WHERESTHESTORY.

Then, I have a dream, like I always do. I see the story in a pattern of

boxes, wake up in the night and write it down. It makes complete sense to

me. I fax it to Peter in the morning. Chuck, Peter’s boss, tells him, “It’s

great, keep him dreaming.”

So, we finish. But not before we have some minor, but typical, corporate

interference from Time execs who wonder, “Why are they breaking new ground

with brilliance, when mediocer but on-time would do just as nicely?”

BADJUDGEMENT BADJUDGEMENT

An exhausted Peter, video cassette tucked under his arm, hops on the plane

for the presentation in Orlando. “Remember Peter, a year from now all this

will be forgotten. But the work, with your name on it, will live forever.”

So, we did it. I look at it today, and it’s still the best promotional video

that I’ve ever seen. Peter knew what he wanted. I was the right choice

for the job. There was enough money in the budget, and enough time to sort

it all out. Bravo, all concerned.

I take a vacation, shoot seme commercials, four months later I get a call

from Chuck. “REDISCOVER AMERICA”, a 30 second TV spot. I work mostly with

Chuck on this one. Peter is doing 10 projects at once and is looking frazzled.

There’s enough money and time, and it seems to go pretty well. The on-camera

interviews are good, but the spokes person sucks. I hate him. I remember

saying to all concerned, after casting, “Anyone but him”. Of course, he’s

their unanimous choice. Oh, well.

I have the usual struggle with the small format cameras. There are a few

interviews I can’t use, one problem or another. But we’re budgeted enough

so that I have plenty to work with. I make video prints of all the interviews

and put them in an order that seems to make sense. Chuck and Peter

cone to the editing room at Vic Losick’s and we put it together. Looks

good. We agree. Chuck asks, “What about that other black guy, the teacher?”

I tell him there was a problem with the shot.

It’s not so easy, this small format stuff.

We get good feedback from the advertising agency. The finished product looks

good, with the exception of the spokes person with the migrain. Why is it

he looks so right in the Advil spot?

It’s 1991, and I have the best year ever. Win some awards, do a video for

Pace University, and several commercials. DOLLARSDOLLARSDOLLARS

Peter calls me late in the year. We should talk. Chuck does most of the

talking. There are projects in the works but Time-Warner, as it now

is, has installed an in-house, give a child a camcorder, production group.

Their work is dreadful, but the stockholders are saving sheckels so guess

who gets the projects. Chuck says he’s got something he wants to do, but

no money. He uses the FAVOR word. He uses it several times during the

meeting. I figure, “What the hell, these guys have been good to me.”

I tell him I’ll do it, but there’s something about it that bothers me.

Chuck’s got three thousand bucks to do a three or four minute piece. By

the time I buy the stock, pay the crew, and do the transfers, I will be out

a thousand dollars. “But what the hell, these guys have been good to me”.

Of course, I fail to mention that I’ve been good to them. But the money

is not what bothers me. They want to do the edit. MAJOR ANXIETY ALARM.

No client has ever looked at my dailies. EVER. There are so many problems

inherent in the technology that I use that I begin to worry: What if there

aren’t enough shots? What if the miniscule budget doesn’t cover the three

or four days I need to get the material? How will Peter handle the edit,

considering the constant techical fuck ups in the technology: the drop

out, the blanking,etc ?

I remind Peter and Chuck of the origional spiel I gave them, “I don’t use

small format video because it’s cheaper.”. I am very worried about this.

Chuck uses the FAVOR word again and I tell them I’ll do it. But Chuck

knows, and he’s right, that I can’t look through the lens without trying

to make some magic happen. So he figures that I’ll give him something he

can use, even though there is no budget and Peter will be going through the

dailies. I’ve never done anything like this before. I’m very worried

about this.

We shoot the job. I have Steve Robinson do the transfers because I have a

meeting on another project. Steve has worked for me for four years and

knows the drill, but an odd thing happens. I check in with Steve in the

transfer room late in the day, and he’s watching MTV while transfering video

tape. “How’s the footage?”, I inquire, like he’s even looked at it. I

do not have the budget to go through the material again, and hope that he’s

actually seen some of it; inbetween Michael Jackson and Madonna, of course.

The funny thing is that I’m the one whose losing money here. Steve is

getting his normal day rate, but he’s copping an attitude because there’s

no money in the budget for dinners and such. I’m losing money and he’s

slacking off. I have trouble understanding this.

I see the finished video and I don’t like it, but of course I don’t say much

to Peter and Chuck. It’s slow and the shot selection is not what I would

have made, but what the hell, its a finished product, made for nothing. Peter

and Chuck seem pleased.

There are dark clouds on the horizon now. Time-Warner is not my only client

to install in-house, give a child a camcorder production departments. CBS,

ABC, and my two biggest ad agencies follow suit. Well, it was nice while

it lasted. Suddenly I can’t get any work. My savings begins to disappear.

The shaky economy has caught up with me. Trouble with Inge begins. I am

depressed. Peter calls.

Another little video. Another no money for this project. Another favor.

“But what the hell, these guys have been good to me.”

Even though Steve robinson is getting his day rate (I never asked him to take

less) he begins fucking up the audio in a major way. This has been coming

for a while now. I’d been listening to his whining about his unhappy, unfullfilled

life, and dealing with his ever present arrogance. I’d even had to

endure his flirtations. But now, bad audio. I’m so mad at him that I don’t

pay him for the job. I’m running out of money and I figure if I pay him

I’ll lose $800, but if I don’t pay him I’ll make $1000. So I don’t.

We finish the video and the result is about the same as the first. Peter

and Chuck seem pleased and I hate it. There are some good shots, but the

edit is way off and Peter is beginning to grumble about problems he’s

having with certain shots. Problems with certain shots???? He used to do

this for a hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Now he’s doing it for five.

He’s lucky he’s not having problems with all the shots.

My personal situation has grown darker. Old clients^have dried up. New

projects are collapsing. Money is scarce. My financial situation has put

a major strain on my relationship with Inge. By late ’92 we are talking

about splitting. Inge has been the one unshakable constant in my life for

the last nine years, and now it seems to be eading. I am unprepared for

severity of the depression I feel. Suicide is now a consideration. But wait

a minute, hold everything. Peter’s on the phone.

Another little video. Another no money for this project. “But what the hell,

these guys have been good to me.”. Wait a minute, where’s the favor part?

Nobody mentions the FAVOR word. Then it comes to me in one of those MARLON

BRANDO APOCALYPSE NOW DIAMOND BULLET IN MY FOREHEAD moments. This is no

longer a favor, it’s a job. The five thousand dollar video has become a way

of life for these guys. This was no longer a “Let’s do this to show the boys

upstairs so we can get money for the big one.”. THIS WAS THE BIG ONE.

Time-Warner, my favorite client had become a charity case. But hey, so was

I. I had finally done what I said I would never do. I was shooting small

format video because it was cheaper. Strangely enough, something else bothered

me even more. Peter and Chuck were both kvetching about their respective

positions at T.W. They were biding their time, they said, until they could

leave and start their own company.

WHAT?!?!?!?!?!?!?!

I’m having another DIAMOND BULLET IN MY FOREHEAD moment. These guys were

making these little low budget, no money for this project, do me this favor

videos, while they are drawing salaries from T.W., in order to put together

a sample reel, that I am shooting for them for nothing, so that they can open

a production company in direct competition with me The Scooter

would give this one a thousand “HOLY COWS”. “But what the hell, these guys

have been good to me.”.

I shot Peter’s little video. What the hell else was I going to do. I

replaced Steve with another sound recordist. Steve, by this time was threatening

to sue me for stiffing him on the last video. I was still so angry

that I wouldn’t talk to him. Peter was now complaining about problems with

the footage. Major problems. It seems that the digital processing unit

was blanking more than usual during the transfer process. This had happened

before on both PRIDE AND PASSION and REDISCOVER AMERICA, but I had been

in the editing room to deal with it. Peter could not afford me in the edit

suite now and had instead listened to the editor at EPG, who tried to cover

his ass and gave bogus advice.

It’s not so easy, this small format stuff.

1993 begins. Horror after horror, until I sink so low that everything is

bottom. Dark, slow, hopeless, filthy, suicidal. Pick your own order of

preference.

My health is failing. I’m weak. Cold sweats in the night. Nausea. Diarhea.

Fever. A strange lump on my face that is diagnosed as ingrown facial hair.

My fear, of course, is AIDS. I’m tested. I’m negative. I realize that my

negative AIDS test is the first good news I’ve had in a year.

Blood test results: seems when I was in the middle east I caught Hepatitis,

and developed an antibody to it. Other than that, my illness remains a

mystery. Several projects on which I’m bidding disappear. I start looking

for an apartment. Peter calls.

Another little video. No talk of favors. No talk of no money for this

project. This is simply what he does now. That is; this is what he does

now, while he draws a salary from T.W., in order to put together a sample

reel, that I am shooting for him for nothing, so that he can open a production

company in direct competition with me. YIPES!

This time Peter does a lot of complaining about technical problems that

he’s experiencing lately with my footage. I try to go over his problems

one by one, but he wants to lump them together into one unforgivable pile

of misstakes and call it SLOPPINESS. Not only am I broke and dying, but now

I’m a slob. Hey, whatever turns you on. Of course, I fail to mention cheapness,

or you get what you pay for. Peter once made a video for a hundred

and fifty thousand dollars, and his director was a prince. Now he’s making

them for five, and if there are any technical problems, which invariably

there will be, then his director is a slob. Or am I even a director anymore?

All I know is I’m trying to stay alive, and maybe still try to create a

little magic along the way.

“O.K., when do we start?”

“Not so fast, you slob you, there’s a catch.”

*

Oh boy, just what I was waiting for. Chuck has sold Entertainment Weekly

Magazine on doing a cheap promotional video, somewhere in the $6500 range.

This budget is to include post production, even though Peter will do the

edit.

DANGER WILL ROBINSON

I agree to do it, but it smacks of bad deal. If post production costs,

over which I have no control, go overbudget, thenfunds will have to come

from production costs, from which I’m not making any money anyway.

“But what the hell, these guys have been good to me.”

I move out of the apartment I have shared with Inge for the last six years

into a studio on East 44th street. I suffer depression more intense than I

could ever hope to desribe.

My body goes berserk and throws a seizure, and I 911 to intensive care at

University Hospital. Lots of Doctors. Lots of guessing. No conclusions.

Out in four days, I shoot the E.W. video. Claudio is my new sound man.

He has bad breath, B.O., and no idea what he’s doing. But he works cheap.

Hey, at least he charges accordingly. After the third day of a five day

shoot Claudio wants to know why he hasn’t been paid yet. Poor Claudio.

Of course, no one seems to care that I have not been paid the advance

check as yet, even though we’ve shot three days already and production

cash has had to come out of my pocket. This has been the M.O. for the

last four videos. I don’t get the advance check until the production is

over. In other words I, a slob, have been financing Time Warner, the

largest media conglomerate on earth for the last year. Think about it.

But hey, Claudio wants his money. I enjoy hating Claudio.

The fever episodes are more frequent now. Hospital stays of usually three

days or so. Lots of Doctors. Lots of guessing. No conclusions.

I transfer the E.W. footage and there is a new glitch, something on the

bottom of the frame. Its intermittent. It’s a mystery. Slob stuff,

no doubt. I change cameras. It goes away. It comes back. I call Sony.

I call everybody. Lots of Doctors. Lots of guessing. No conclusions.

Back in the hospital. I’m poked full of holes. TESTSTESTSTESTS

Hospitals, I find out, are a lot like Claudio. They say, “PAY ME”. So I

do something I’ve never done before, I pay the hospital with money that’s

supposed to go to crew and venders. The big rollover. What the hell, if

I’m dead the crew’s not going to get paid anyway. It seemed logical at the

time. I’m now spending so much time sick that illness is becoming familiar.

DOCTORS DOCTORS

PAY ME PAY ME

LOTS OF GUESSING

NO CONCLUSIONS

The wolves are at the door now, crew and vender wise, but I stall as best

I can. Peter has an expanded version of the E.W. video to shoot, and even

though he is now totally convinced of my slobdom, he’s got no choice but to

have me shoot it. The new E.W. footage has to be shot quickly, and I am now

on the edge of ambulatory. The daily shooting is a blur now. Hospital

treatments between shooting days. Keep shooting. Keep shooting. Try to

make some magic happen. DOCTORS DOCTORS PAY ME PAY ME.

I’m laying in a pool of fever sweat in the 44th Street apartment. Somehow ,

I’ve got to get it together enough to get to the West Village to cover a

photo shoot for a Puerto Rican comedian named John Leguizamo for E.W.

I do it with 103 degree fever. The footage is great. I get an odd satisfaction

from the fact that I can still make magic happen, even with a 103

degree fever.

The rest of the shooting has faded. The month after we wrap the E.W. is a

dark amalgam of hospital and apartment. Of darkness and stench and weakness

and crying and fever and hopelessness. All the while, in the distance, angry

venders on the phone and DOCTORS DOCTORS PAY ME PAY ME. I had been given

a check by E.W., which of course, I had given to the hospital. The shit will

hit the fan now. But at least there will be a fan.

In the midst of this chaos the lump in my right cheek, which has been diagnosed

by an esteemed dermatologist as ingrown facial hair, begins to rapidly

expand. Too weak from fever to get to the bathroom, I reach for the mirror

next to the bed and view this new chapter in my personal apocalypse.

10

Small black objects, the size of pencil dots, seemed* to appear through the

pores in the skin covering the lump. They appeared and disappeared again

and again, until I noticed slightly larger objects, that seemed to be moving,

on other parts of my face and arms. Then I felt the movement and the slight

sting, as the objects broke the skin. Tiny insects, which seemed able to

fly short distances, were coming through the skin covering the lump in my

face. I remember hearing the sobs before feeling the tears. All I could

do was cry. I thought I had lost ray mind. I wondered where Inge was.

While I waited for my friends from EMS, I thought about being a child

again. The delicious sensation of protection and nurturing and terry cloth.

FIX ME I’M BROKEN.

I remember looking up from the gurney at the face of the nurse in the E.R.

who was holding her hand over her mouth and gasping “Oh my god”. Ordinarily,

this would be an annoying reaction from a medical professional. But , in

this case, it actually made me feel better. Maybe this was really happening.

Maybe I wasn’t really nuts.

It took a long time to I.D. the bugs. Meanwhile the fever episodes continued.

Oddly, the Doctors do not connect the two. The Doctors seem to be pretending

that the bugs are happening to someone else. Doctors do not deal with bugs.

Doctors deal with fever. Doctors look down at you, with a concerned look

they must go to drama school to perfect, and say, “You seem to have You

seem to have You seem to have ” followed by PAY ME PAY ME.

“Do you think the bugs are connected to the fever?”, I innocently ask my

Physician/thespian/concerned guy. ”Hmmnmmmmm”, he responds, looking more

concerned than ever. Like he really gives a shit, “…what makes you

say that?”.

The tests come back BINGO DIAGNOSIS BUG-A-RAMA

My intestinal and respiratory systems have become a sort of Disneyworld for

Middle Eastern parasytes. It seems I had brought unwanted passengers back

with me from the trip to Egypt I had made with Peter and Steve for Time

Magazine. I had been so careful. Bottled water. Cooked food. No salads.

Maybe it was that Felafel I had eaten with the wife of the Time Bureau Chief

on my last day in Cairo.

11

My esteemed Physician/thespian/concerned guys swing into action. I’m

*

I.V.’d like a porcupine and pumped full of poison to eliminate these pesky

critters. It’s like the big round up. “Take em to Missouri, Matt.”

Back in the 44th St. apartment. The fever episodes are gone now. Of course,

the poison I’m full of, to kill my guests, is making me sick enough to

want to join them. The answering machine is filled with pleas and demands

from people I owe money to: venders, crew, Peter, Inge, DOCTORS DOCTORS

PAY ME PAY ME.

Weak and dazed from nasty combinations of Pharmaceuticals, I pick up the

phone. It’s Peter. A half hour harangue on the virtues of bill paying.

Of course, Peter has not noticed that I have not gone chapter eleven. I

could have used that option, but it’s not really my intention to stiff

anyone. Except maybe for Steve. I just have no money. Also, Peter’s

tirade is landing on a pretty battered psyche. Like the endless squadrons

of tiny Yassir Arafats, with wings and claws, that landed and took off from

the flight deck that was once my face.

It seems that my small army of disgruntled venders, unable to squeaze any

more money out of me, are now pestering Peter. Not to mention Claudio. “Peter

help me. He won’t pay me. What can I do?”. TRY BRUSHING YOUR TEETH YOU MAGGOT.

I love hating Claudio.

Peter suddenly segues from debt diatribe to concerned friend. It’s one

of his endearing qualities. As he’s asking about how I’m feeling, I realize

that he has no idea how sick I’ve been. I’m having another DIAMOND BULLET

IN THE FOREHEAD moment. No one really knows that I’ve been sick. I have

gone through this experience completely alone. My relationship with Inge

had been so fulfilling that any friends I had were now pretty distant.

Ther was only Inge and my work. Now both were gone, replaced by illness

and debt. What a world.

Peter seems genuinely concerned. Why do I love this guy? When Peter is in

his sincere, concerned friend mode he is irresistable. The E.W. edit is

finished to rave reviews and Peter is trying to find ways to creatively deal

with my outstanding debts. He still doesn’t understand why I don’t pay some

of them. This behavior amazes me. Did he think I had a trust fund? Did

he ever realize that I lost money on each of his low budget, no money for

this project, do me a favor, and oh by the way make some magic happen, you

slob you, videos? Did he think that Time Warner sent me a paycheck every

week, like the one they sent to him? Has he long since forgotten my DON’T

SHOOT SMA&L FORMAT VIDEO BECAUSE IT’S CHEAPER warnings? Does He really think

12

that he and Chuck share no resposibility for this mess, when all the while

they have been drawing salaries from T.W. in order to put together a sample

reel, that I have been shooting for nothing, so that they can open a production

company in direct competition with me?

GET REAL FELLAS!

So, now it’s 1994.

Late last summer I decided to be saved by my family. I took with me only

a small amount of light clothing, tee shirts and jeans mostly, and moved into

my sister’s house in East Hampton. I left the rest in the 44th street apartment.

I simply could not face that place again, and have no idea what happened

to the stuff I left there.

My health improved over the winter and other than some occasional wierd

stuff with my face I’m perfectly fine now. I had several phone conversations

with Inge about meeting, having lunch, talking, but she never returned the

call I made to her on her birthday. That was two months ago.

So, what is to be learned from this cautionary catharsis? I know that

telling this tale is the first time I’ve attempted to relive the events of

the last few years. I know that until I’ve done that, I can’t begin the

next faze of my life. Whatever the fuck that is.

So let’s look at the cast of characters.

Shaun, Inge, Peter, Chuck, Steve, even Claudio. Are they good guys?

Are they bad guys? I think that each of them is probably a little of

both. Each of them is probobly looking to gain an edge and avoid some

blame, just like everybody else. And maybe , along the way, try to make

a little magic happen.

TALL GUYS I HAVE KNOWN

TALL GUYS I HAVE KNOWN

Or: How some desperados with film equipment

gained access, with questionable credentials, to a

major sports event in Scotland, created an incredible

film, and sold it to a television network – only

to be bushwhacked by a too-tall sports mogul in Cleveland.

 by Shaun Costello

Jim McKay interviews Jack Nicklaus and tournament winner Tom Weiskopf at the British Open in Troon Scotland. Bill is on the far left, getting more great footage.

Jim McKay interviews Jack Nicklaus and tournament winner Tom Weiskopf at the British Open in Troon Scotland. Bill is on the far left, getting more great footage.

In January or February of 1974 Gil Markle and I made a trip to Cleveland to do battle with Super-Agent Mark McCormack, who held in his hands the legality of our selling a film we had made to CBS Television. The summer before, we had travelled to Scotland to make a film about the British Open Golf Tournament. Actually, we were there to shoot some footage of Johnny Miller, a professional golfer who had gained celebrity by winning the U.S. Open earlier that year with a miraculous score of ‘63’ in the final round. Gil’s First Lieutenant Mike Forhan had scored a major coup by signing Miller to lend his name to what would become the Johnny Miller Golf Academy, which would operate under the umbrella of Gil’s travel company ALSG. Miller was young and blonde and handsome, and now he was famous – boding well for profitable possibilities for the Golf Academy. “Learn golf in Scotland where golf was born.” It seemed like a natural. American teens flocking to Scotland to have their ‘swing planes’ and ‘short games’ corrected by the handsome and now-famous Johnny Miller. So we made the trip to Scotland to make a promotional film about Johnny Miller and his golf academy. And, other than Mike, none of us knew a thing about golf.

Johnny Miller had won the U.S. Open earlier in the year, scoring a miraculous 63 in the final round.

Johnny Miller had won the U.S. Open earlier in the year, scoring a miraculous 63 in the final round.

My participation in this endeavor was purely accidental. I was simply tagging along with Gil’s brother Bill, who was a close friend, and with whom I had worked on several film projects. Bill and his wife Viki, who had also become a close friend, were going to Scotland to make a film, and we thought it would be fun to include me. So, Bill, Viki and I, along with Gil, who I was meeting for the first time, boarded an ALSG-chartered stretched DC8 for the flight to London.

The flight took forever. A re-fueling stop at Shannon went awry when the Aer Lingus ground crew broke the pressure seal on the cargo door. We waited five hours on the Shannon tarmac for the seal to be repaired. Next stop Stuttgart Germany. This was an ALSG charter, and we had two waves of eager and happy student travelers whose destination was the Fatherland. More problems with the plane in Stuttgart, with another five or six hours of down time. Finally, we took off for London’s Gatwick Airport, the main venue for chartered planes landing in the London area. This would lead to my first “How does Gil do that” moment.

 I did the Player interview, and he was everything Whitaker said he would be, and more.

I did the Player interview, and he was everything Whitaker said he would be, and more.

The long journey from JFK to Gatwick took over thirty hours, and we were dirty and exhausted. I don’t sleep on planes, and all I could think of was a shower and a welcoming bed. We remained onboard while the ALSG student travelers joyfully deplaned to begin their European adventure. Bill, Viki and I remained near our seats while Gil supervised the exiting kids at the rear of the plane. Bill and Viki looked as groggy as I felt, but Gil had changed gears and was in ‘executive-in-charge mode.’ Several of ALSG’s London personnel had boarded the plane, and Gil was involved in animated discussions, signing papers, accepting cash disbursements, and generally being the guy in charge. I was amazed. I remember thinking, ‘how can he do this?’ Gil was one of those rare people who, regardless of sleep deprivation, and in this case over thirty hours in a crowded, smelly DC8, could simply change gears and do what was necessary. This would not be the last time I would witness Gil’s exceptional behavior under duress.

We caught the overnight  Caledonian Sleeper for the trip to Glasgow

We caught the overnight Caledonian Sleeper for the trip to Glasgow

Three days in London. Gil had business to take care of in ALSG’s London Office, and the rest of us, ensconced at the Russell Square Hotel, did what Americans in London usually do. Then off to London’s Euston Station to catch the overnight “Caledonian Sleeper to Glasgow. Much story swapping and laughter on the train. I was getting to know Gil and enjoying him – his spontaneous laughter, and how he made intense eye contact when you spoke, listening to every word, and appreciating your input. An eventful journey north. We were met at Glasgow station by Mike Forhan, who had appropriated a minivan, and who drove us to Troon where the British Open was about to begin.

Crafty Mike Forhan, through methods he never full disclosed, had befriended the female assistant to Keith MacKenzie, who ran the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of Scotland, and had hondled press credentials for all of us. God only know what he had told her. So we now had unlimited access to Troon’s ancient golf course, and to all of the players in the tournament. The British Open is one of the four “Majors” and all of the world’s famous golfers were on hand: Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Johnny Miller, everybody – and the scene was visually magnificent, with tanned faces ready to be photographed with a background of stormy skies, and the wind-blown sea grasses of the Troon links. It was quite a site. We quickly realized that the spectacle before us was much bigger that Johnny Miller and his golf academy. We had unrestricted access to a major sporting event.

Johnny Miller on the fairway at Troon.

Johnny Miller on the fairway at Troon.

With a fearlessness that comes from not having the slightest idea what we were doing, we proceeded to approach golfers for on-camera interviews, and to our surprise and delight, they were quite willing to participate. After all, those PRESS arm bands we wore, regardless if how surreptitiously obtained, spoke of our credentialed presence at this event.

Bill, of course, did the camera work, with Gil, who was a novice at location sound recording, recording everything on Bill’s Nagra. Mike was operating behind the scenes, making arrangements, and targeting golfers for interviews. Gil had handed me his Nikon with a motor drive and 200 frame bulk loader, and I began taking stills of the event, and of our participation in it.

Glen Campbell during his hilarious interview with Gil Markle, who had trouble keeping his composure.

Glen Campbell during his hilarious interview with Gil Markle, who had trouble keeping his composure.

Gil did most of the interviews, most notably of singer Glen Campbell, who was an avid golf fan, and who gladly agreed to participate. Gil’s interview with Campbell was quite good until he began to lose it. I think the absurdity of the moment got to him. Here he was, in Troon Scotland, interviewing a major celebrity about golf, something he knew nothing about. And Campbell, not the brightest light in the room, saw Gil’s levity as part and parcel of the interview process. The more Campbell talked on about golf, the golfers, Johnny Miller, his Scottish ancestry, and his very own Glen Campbell Los Angeles Open Golf Tournament, the more difficult it became for Gil to maintain his composure. The interview, in its entirety, is in the finished film, and it is hilarious indeed.

I spotted CBS commentator Jack Whitaker approaching the 18th Green and approached him to participate, which he graciously did. Gil interviewed him and his lines became a mainstay of the film. Whitaker mentioned to me that Gary Player was the best interview on the tour. He was outspoken, and answered questions without regard for political correctness.

CBS commentator Jack Whitaker tipped me off to the fact that Gary Player was the best interview on the tour.

CBS commentator Jack Whitaker tipped me off to the fact that Gary Player was the best interview on the tour.

Mike, who was the only member of this conspiracy who actually knew anything about golf, interviewed Graham Marsh and a few others, while I kept an eye out for Gary Player, who I finally located in the lobby of Troon’s famous Marine Hotel. Player, like most of his fellow golfers, was gracious and polite, and we made an appointment for an interview later that afternoon. I did the Player interview, and he was everything Whitaker said he would be, and more. Player delivered the most memorable lines in the finished film, and did not hesitate to sign a release, an issue that plagued us with some of the other golfers.

Gary Player was the best interview on the tour.

Gary Player was the best interview on the tour.

With much better than expected material in the can, we returned to London, where we had the negative developed by Color Film Services LTD, who struck the most beautiful work print I had ever seen. Bill, as usual had done an outstanding job with his camera. After a week in cold and rainy Troon, Bill, Viki and I gladly hopped a plane for the coast of Spain, to soak up some sun, do a little acid, and have what turned out to be a memorable time – worth its own story at some later date.

Bill and Gil interviewing Tom Weiskopf.

Bill and Gil interviewing Tom Weiskopf.

Back in New York, Bill and I spent eight weeks editing the film. We had worked on projects before and worked amazingly well together – seldom disagreeing on even the slightest editorial issue. It became obvious that we had something special on our hands. I came up with the obvious tile FOUR DAYS AT TROON. I had developed many contacts at some of the largest advertising agencies, so it became my job to find a buyer. Through various trade directories, I was able to find out which advertising agencies represented British products with American markets, which seemed like our best bet. The Ted Bates Agency represented Schweppes, and Wilkinson Sword razor blades, so I called.

Jack Nickaus's people generously granted us his release, even though we had forgotten to ask for it.

Jack Nickaus’s people generously granted us his release, even though we had forgotten to ask for it.

I was stunned at how positively I was received, having in my possession thirty minutes of fully edited television programming. I made the presentation to the Creative Group on Schweppes, and it could not have gone any better. The Creative Director said, “We’ll take the whole thing, give full sponsorship, provided you can get CBS to run it, but I can’t see them not loving this.” He gave me the name of the head of CBS Sports, and mentioned that this film would make a great teaser, the night before day one of CBS’s coverage of The Masters.

Viki Markle holding one of Bill's film magazines. Was there ever anyone lovelier?

Viki Markle holding one of Bill’s film magazines. Was there ever anyone lovelier?

I reported back to Gil and Bill, and the three of us were both stunned and delighted by our situation. It was decided that Gil and I would pitch CBS together. It’s amazing the difference between selling an idea, and selling a finished product. CBS loved the film. They liked the Bates idea about running Four Days At Troon as a teaser before the Masters. We had full sponsorship, the Network loved our film, and these desperados with questionably obtained press credentials were happy campers indeed. Then the roof fell in.

Mike Forhan and Bill Markle along the fairway at Troon

Mike Forhan and Bill Markle along the fairway at Troon

We had been careless about getting releases. A release is a document allowing a film maker or a photographer to sell an image of a participant in a photograph or an on-camera interview for commercial purposes. Without a signed release, the buyer, in this case CBS, would fear litigation and refuse to purchase the film for broadcast purposes. We were missing two releases, and they were whoppers – Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer. While Nicklaus was not interviewed, Bill shot him on the practice tee joking with other golfers, and he delivered some memorable lines. Palmer gave us an interview. We would need both. CBS made that clear.

Bill Markle shooting the Glen Campbell interview.

Bill Markle shooting the Glen Campbell interview.

I called Nicklaus’s organization, Golden Bear Enterprises, and explained our situation. His people were cordial and agreed to attend a screening which we arranged at the Movielab screening room. Their only concern was that Jack Nicklaus was presented in a positive way. They were delighted with the film and agreed to have Jack sign a release. One down – one to go. The Palmer release would be more difficult.

Arnold Palmer was represented by Mark McCormack, who had invented the occupation now known as the Sports Agent. He had started out with Arnold Palmer as his only client, and quickly made Palmer a rich man, while creating a sports empire that would become known as International Management Group, the first mega sports agency. McCormack, unknown to us, also owned Trans World International, the colossal production Company that owned the exclusive film rights to the British Open, where we had, through sleight of hand, obtained access to make our film, which CBS would not buy without Palmer’s legal participation. There wasn’t a chance in hell that McCormack would allow Palmer to sign a release for a film that would be in direct competition with his own exclusive arrangement between International Management Group, and The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of Scotland. We were screwed – we just didn’t know it.

Bill, Gil and Mike interviewing Graham Marsh

Bill, Gil and Mike interviewing Graham Marsh

At this point I should mention the film known as Four Days At Troon, while editorially finished, remained in what is known as interlock. The picture was the work print that had been edited by Bill and I, and the sound track, while mixed, existed as a separate strand. This meant that the film could be viewed only on an editing machine, or in an interlock screening room. Mark McCormack’s offices were in Cleveland, and there was no interlock screening facility in the city by the lake. The alternative was to rent a portable interlock projector in New York and lug it to Cleveland. This machine is a large and cumbersome device, and ‘portable’ is a stretch in describing it. We had Ceco in New York ship the enormous projector to Long View Farm, where we could watch the film projected, and rehearse the machine’s workings.

Early the next morning, Gil and I somehow squeezed this monstrosity into his Jaguar XKE, and began the journey to Logan Airport in Boston, to catch a flight to Cleveland in order to pitch our project to a man who had absolutely no intention of granting our request. It was an exhausting process, loading and unloading this machine, first at Logan and then at Cleveland Airport. Then the cab ride to One Erie View Plaza in downtown Cleveland, the headquarters of International Management Group.

Gil lugging his sound equipment next to the Marine Hotel.

Gil lugging his sound equipment next to the Marine Hotel.

We were basically treated with contempt at all levels by the employees of IMG, from the surly receptionist right on up to the boss himself. Their universal disdain for us was well rehearsed. Led to their conference room, we were left to set up the beastly device on the far end of the conference table. I set about threading picture while Gil handled the sound track, which had to be threaded into a separate machine which was synchronized to the projector electronically. As we began to set up the projector for screening, Gil said, “I just hope he’s not a tall guy.”

“Who?”, I responded.

“McCormack. Who do you think?”

“I don’t know. I’ve never met him.”

“I just don’t like tall guys.”

I assumed that the philosopher was philosophizing, so I remained silent.

“I hate to admit it, but tall guys intimidate me. They shouldn’t, but they do. I don’t like looking up at them. Makes me uncomfortable. I just hope he’s not a tall guy.”

A few moments late the door opened and in strutted the man himself, Mark McCormack, all six foot five inches of him. My heart sank.

A few moments later the door opened and in strutted the man himself, Mark McCormack, all six foot five inches of him. My heart sank.

When we finished setting up the unruly machine, IMG’s key personnel began taking seats around the table. No one really greeted us, they just nodded and seemed restless. I announced that we were ready to begin, and someone at the far end of the table made a call. A few moments late the door opened and in strutted the man himself, Mark McCormack, all six foot five inches of him. My heart sank.

Gil and I began our rehearsed pitch on the history of the project and McCormack cut us off immediately.

“Just show the thing”, he said. “I agreed to see it, so I’ll see it. I don’t want to hear sob stories about how hard you worked, and how you can’t sell the thing without releases. Turn it on.”

We turned on the cumbersome machinery and the film began. I marveled at the extraordinary quality of the work print, made for us by that London lab. To say that the audience was unreceptive would be an understatement. Phone calls were made and received by people all around the table, who seemed totally uninterested by what was being screened. We had been sand bagged – bushwhacked – set up for a fall by a roomful of mid-western lawyers hell bent on humiliating the wise guys from the big city who had come on their hands and knees, begging the almighty sports mogul for his forgiveness and approval. Twenty minutes into the film, McCormack stood up and in a loud voice simply said “NO”, and walked out the door, followed in twos and threes by his cronies, leaving Gil and I alone while the film was still running. We were left with a lackey who was responsible to see the offending infidels to the street.

McCormack stood up and in a loud voice simply said “NO”, and walked out the door.

McCormack stood up and in a loud voice simply said “NO”, and walked out the door.

We didn’t say much in the cab back to the airport, or on the flight back to Logan. What was there to say? About an hour into the flight the pilot announced that we would be making an unexpected stop at Albany. The plane had a cracked windshield, and repair was required. So Gil and I spent a mostly silent few hours in a bar at Albany Airport, drinking steadily until we were both pretty plastered. Finally, his eyes glazed over with alcohol, and his face contorted in philosophical determination, Gil looked up at me and, without rancor, said, “Tall Guys.”

FDAT higher res

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© 2015 Shaun Costello

SOME SPIT IN THE HANDSHAKE

 This story is excerpted from Shaun Costello’s memoir:

RISKY BEHAVIOR

Sex, Gangsters and Deception in the Time of ‘Groovy’

 

 

SOME SPIT IN THE HANDSHAKE

Handshake 

The last hurrah for La Cosa Nostra

 

by Shaun Costello

 

 

“I’ll tell you who is going to be there. Just the who’s-who of organized crime in America, that’s who. Members from all of the five New York families, and not just them. Representatives from all over the country will be at this thing. Chicago, Las Vegas, California, everywhere, and you’re being asked to do this. Do you know what kind of an honor this is – to be asked to do this? How can you even think about it? This is not something you think about. He trusts you enough to ask you to do this. So you do this, and that’s all there is to it.” This was Cal Young in sales mode, trying to convince me to do something that any person in his right mind would reject out of hand. But he wasn’t talking to any person in his right mind, he was talking to me, and I didn’t need much convincing.

It was close to midnight, and we on the Van Wyck Expressway in Cal's car, heading back to Manhattan from a meeting with Dominick Cataldo.

It was close to midnight, and we on the Van Wyck Expressway in Cal’s car, heading back to Manhattan from a meeting with Dominick Cataldo.

It was close to midnight, and we were on the Van Wyck Expressway, in Cal’s car, heading back to Manhattan from a meeting with Dominick Cataldo, also known as ‘Lil Dom’, also known as ‘Double Decker Dom’, and I had made up my mind to agree to Cataldo’s proposition long before Cal ever started his pitch.

It was ten that morning when I got the call up in the country. I lived on a small horse farm in the tiny hamlet of Krumville, about ninety minutes north of the city, where I spent my time jumping Thoroughbreds over fences, tending my vegetable garden, and living the life of a make-believe country gentleman. At this point I should mention that my weathered barn jacket/muddy Wellington boot/Ralph Laurenesque existence, horses and all, was paid for by my day job, as one of America’s most active producers of pornographic movies. No one up in Krumville knew that, of course. To my neighbors, I was involved in the film business down in the city, which they found exotic.

I spent my time jumping thoroughbreds over fences, tending my vegetable garden, and living the life of a make believe country gentleman.

I spent my time jumping thoroughbreds over fences, tending my vegetable garden, and living the life of a make believe country gentleman.

I had some connection to television, and produced films for corporate clients which, to the locals, seemed mysterious and fascinating. And all this was true, but the bulk of the money I made in those days came from producing porn, a fact that I managed to keep a secret from my friends and neighbors. A good thing too, since that kind of information would have been hot gossip down at the feed store. In the country I lived the part, and ninety miles away, down in the big city, I did the sometimes-questionable work that paid for it.

  I had met Cal in the city a few times, and to be truthful, was not very impressed. He was an independent motion picture distributor, mostly porn, with some cheap Splatter Movies, and even cheaper Kung Fu imports thrown in. He was a seat-of-the-pants operator with an exaggerated view of his immediate possibilities. “I’ve got some backers lined up, and as soon as I can make the arrangements I’m going to call. Just be ready because I’m going to keep you busy for a while.” Guys like Cal were usually full of hot air, but I made it a point not to blow them off. You just never knew. So he called.

He was an independent Motion Picture distributor, mostly porn, with some cheap splatter movies, and even cheaper Kung Fu imports thrown in.

He was an independent Motion Picture distributor, mostly porn, with some cheap splatter movies, and even cheaper Kung Fu imports thrown in.

“You remember when I told you about a possible backer I’ve been working on?” I did, or at least I said I did. “Well, I think this is going to work out. He’s getting his ducks in line, but there’s a catch.” There almost always is. “He wants to meet you first. He does everything on a handshake, and he’s got to meet you first.” I didn’t like the sound of this. And I really didn’t need the money, not from Cal anyway. I had two sources in the city who paid top dollar for my X-rated efforts, and kept me as busy as I needed to be, and neither of them needed to shake my hand. Cal obviously sensed my reluctance, and started a relentless barrage of reasons why it was in my best interest to come down to the city and meet his guy. I’m not sure why I caved, maybe because I was a wimp, and couldn’t take any more of Cal’s whining, or maybe because I thought it prudent to listen to his backer’s proposition. I’ll go with wimp for now.

Cal Young lived in a rent-controlled apartment at 40 Sutton Place.

Cal Young lived in a rent-controlled apartment at 40 Sutton Place.

Cal Young lived in a rent controlled apartment at 40 Sutton Place, one of Manhattan’s priciest streets, that he had inherited from his uncle, Max Youngstein, a major Hollywood producer who, a few years earlier, had accepted the Best Picture Oscar for The Deer Hunter. The walls were covered with photographs of his uncle, hobnobbing and canoodling with movie stars and professional athletes.  The apartment, regardless of its elegant address, was furnished like a Holiday Inn, and Cal couldn’t seem to wait to begin giving me the ten-cent-tour of the pictures on his wall: Uncle Max with Robert DeNiro, Uncle Max with Elizabeth Taylor, Uncle Max with Arnold Palmer, Uncle Max standing on a chair shaking hands with Wilt Chamberlain. Cal gave this photo tour with the gusto of a man who was obviously proud of his family’s show business heritage.

We were to meet Cal’s guy in one of the big glitzy motels just across the Belt Parkway from JFK Airport, and did most of our talking on the drive through Queens. “Just keep an open mind and listen to what he has to say. He’s a very connected guy, if you know what I mean.” He’s turning up his sales pitch. “Very well thought of. This is a guy who is going places, and he can take us with him if we play our cards right.” Cal pulled the car into the parking lot of the Kennedy Motor Inn, and we entered the lobby, which was a maze of mirrors and shiny metal. “Iranians own this place, but to operate out here near the Airport, you’ve got to have permission, and my guy is the one who gives it, for a price.”

We were to meet Cal's guy in one of the big glitzy motels just across the Belt Parkway from JFK Airport.

We were to meet Cal’s guy in one of the big glitzy motels just across the Belt Parkway from JFK Airport.

Past the front desk, and another hundred feet or so down a hallway was a set of double doors, upholstered in red leather, with brass handles. Above the doorway was a sign that read THE CASBAH. “Iranians”, said Cal as he opened one of the doors, revealing a strange sight indeed. It was an enormous room that probably doubled as banquet facility and nightclub. The surface of the walls seemed purposely uneven, like they were covered with a layer of rough concrete, and set in the concrete were thousands of tiny mirrors, differing in size and shape, none more than a few inches across. The effect was dazzling. Anything in the center of the room with enough light on it would be reflected, in many different directions and with varying intensity until the walls became alive with an infinite reflection of whatever entertainment was provided at the room’s center. And in that room’s center was a single round table, lit from above by one spot light, covered with a white table cloth, and surrounded by three chairs. Sitting in one of the chairs was a man wearing a dark suit with a coffee cup in front of him, turning the pages of a newspaper. As each page turned, the movement was infinitely reflected around the room, like a million fans doing the ‘wave’ at a psychedelic ball game. Orson Welles could not have done this any better.

The room swam in the reflections of the turning pages as we approached the table, and ourselves, became part of the show. Cal, ever the salesman, led the way, and I have to admit to being a bit intoxicated by the imagery. “Dom, great to see you. You’re looking good. Well, here he is Dom. This is the guy I’ve been telling you about. Shaun, I’d like you to meet my friend Dominick.” He stuck out his hand for me to shake, but didn’t get up. He swapped some small talk with Cal, mostly about traffic on the Van Wyck and, without asking us to sit, looked up at me. “You shoot both houses”, he said abruptly, leaving me to try and figure out what he was talking about. “Sit down, sit down, take a load off. Look, you shoot both houses – that’s very important – both houses. You start out with the groom’s house. He’s there with his buddies, probably hungover from the bachelor’s party the night before. A lot of joking around is going on. His pals are giving him the business, believe me. These are his last hours as a single guy. You gotta get this. Then over to the Bride’s house. It’s just around the corner. Same kind of thing. She’s getting dressed, and all her friends are going to be there. Lot’s of stories are being told here, if you know what I mean. These are priceless moments. Years from now, her grandchildren can see this. You gotta get this.”

 A wedding? Cal Young has dragged me all the way out to JFK Airport to talk to some guy about shooting a wedding? I’m quietly enraged, but of course say nothing. Meanwhile Cal, who is sitting across the table from me, and next to Dominick, but just out of his field of vision, is grinning from ear to ear, and nodding his head up and down, like a ridiculous bobble head doll, the nodding reflected in thousands of tiny mirrors all around the room, like some kind of preposterous kaleidoscope. All I could think of was strangling him, but of course I just sat there and listened. Dominick wanted me to come out the following week and meet his family, see the houses, and maybe the church, get a feel for everything. Oddly, he  was beginning to grow on me. He was an intense guy, probably in his late forties, with short-cropped, grayish brown hair and rapidly searching eyes, who nervously fiddled with his tie knot as he tried to anticipate my response to his proposition. He could probably be dangerous if provoked, but was surprisingly honest and vulnerable. “Look, this thing is costing me a fortune. Wait ‘til you see the place for the reception. Jesus, when I found out the price I nearly flipped. But I gotta do it. Spare no expense. It’s a matter of pride. Everybody is going to be there, and I mean everybody. It’s got to be first class all the way, even if it puts me in the poor house. Jesus Christ, I had to reach out to the street for part of it, to the shy’s. But I gotta do it, and you gotta help me here. Cal say’s you’re the best, and more important, you’re OK, if you know what I mean. Cal told me who you work for Downtown. Those guys are friends of mine. That’s very important. So what do you say? You wanna come out next week and meet my family?”

This seemed like a sincerely asked question, and I liked him all the more for having asked it. I was touched at this kind of intimate gesture toward someone he had only just met. Like meeting his family would make me one of them. Like it would seal the deal, put some spit in the handshake, finalize the proposition suggested here in The Casbah, reflected in ten thousand mirrors.

By the time we got back to the city I had forgiven Cal Young for his perfidy. Maybe it was the dazzling visuals in The Casbah. Maybe it was actually growing to like Dominick. Maybe it was Cal’s pathetic bobble head routine reflected ten thousand times over. Probably all of the above, but the idea of being invited to this grand an event, populated by the suggested cast of characters, to be allowed to walk freely, as though one of them, among the who’s-who of organized crime in America, was simply an offer I couldn’t refuse.

I’m going to take a moment here to explain why what Dominick had asked me to do was just about impossible to accomplish, something that, at the time, I was busy trying not to think about, because the wedding was six weeks off, and my plan, not that I really had one, was to put off dealing with the reality of the event until the last minute, and simply wing it which was, hard as it may be to accept, how I did everything. First of all, there was no money. Dominick had spent everything he had, even borrowed from shylocks, to cover the cost of the wedding, and the enormous reception that would follow. There was nothing left over to pay for a movie that, as Dominick suggested, I should do as a favor, favor being a word used so often by these guys that it had long since lost its intended meaning. “Look, just do me this favor”, meaning that it was an honor to do for free, something for which you would normally be paid. Favor as transaction. Favor as currency. I should feel honored to do this for free, as a favor for a friend. And then he will be in my debt, so that at any time in the future I can call upon him to repay that favor. But the problem became the Federal Witness Protection Program. By the time you got around to asking for repayment, your friend, whose name was Santini, had been renamed Smith, and relocated to a suburb of Billings Montana, where he would live out his days as a permanent guest of the Federal Government. A whore works for money, but a real man does what he does as a favor. I really couldn’t have cared less. Hanging out with gangsters was payment enough for me.

 I couldn’t shoot Dominick’s movie on film because that would mean stock and lab costs, not to mention the equipment to do the job and the crew to make it happen. Video was the only answer, but this was 1978, and the available video equipment was, by today’s standards, extremely primitive. The camcorder had not yet been invented. Location footage for televised news shows was still shot on 16 MM film, which had to be developed in Motion Picture Laboratories, and rushed back to the studios to get it on the air. There were portable video units available, but they were awkward instruments; the camera connected to the recorder by a cable, clumsy to use, and the image they produced looked worse than your grandparent’s home movies. But I didn’t want to think about any of this. There was plenty of time yet. I had six weeks, and I could spend those weeks hanging out with my new friend, Dominick Cataldo, AKA ‘Lil Dom’, AKA ‘Double Decker Dom’, and his pals from the mob.

Cataldo's house was a simple but tidy and nicely landscaped ranch-style house in Valley Stream.

Cataldo’s house was a simple but tidy and nicely landscaped ranch-style house in Valley Stream.

As the weeks went by, I was invited to dinner twice at Cataldo’s home, which was a simple but tidy and nicely landscaped ranch-style house, in Valley Stream, just over the boarder of Nassau County. Coached by Cal Young, I brought gifts of pastries, on each occasion, from Veniero’s Italian Bakery on the Lower East Side. Midge Cataldo, Dominick’s wife, who I had liked immediately, was a bleached blond housewife who smoked cigarettes while she stirred the sauce, sometimes dropping a bit of ash into the pot that no one seemed to notice. She made a big fuss over my pastries, and prepared delicious manicotti, and braggiole, and ravioli stuffed with pumpkin, and veal, and sautéed broccoli rabbe, and everybody ate everything in front of them, and no one there was the slightest bit overweight, which mystified me.

I brought gifts of pastries, on each occasion, from Veniero's Italian Bakery.

I brought gifts of pastries, on each occasion, from Veniero’s Italian Bakery.

Dominick’s son, the groom-incumbent, made appearances at different times during dinner not wearing a shirt, which made me uncomfortable for some reason. He would sit down, rudely reach across the table and grab a bowl of something, scrape it onto his plate, gobble it down, jump up claiming he had to make a phone call, and disappear, only to return again fifteen minutes later for a repeat performance. Each time he disappeared, Dominick would shake his head and, without looking up, grunt,”Kids”. He was a nasty street-punk, maybe twenty one or so, who was probably snorting coke up in his room between visits to the dinner table. He had totally ignored my presence in his house, and at the table. I couldn’t stand him.

Over some espresso with anisette, Dominick would gush about his family’s expectations for my wedding-movie assignment. “Cal say’s you’re an artist Shaun. I’ve told everybody about you, and what you’re going to do for us. Everybody, the future in-laws too. They can’t wait. They want to see it over and over. They talk about the movie more than they talk about the wedding. We’re going to make copies for everybody. Everybody wants to see it.” Suddenly, he gave me a serious look. “It’s gonna be good, right? I mean, it’s gotta be good. You’re not gonna fuck up on me are you? You fuck up on this, you put me in a serious bind here. You know what I’m saying? Because if this movie’s not good Shaun, you embarrass me in front of all my family, everybody I know.” He’s getting louder and I’m getting nervous. “I went way out on a limb, asking you to do this. You fuck up, and I’m the laughing stock of the entire universe, am I getting through to you? Do you read me? You fuck up on this, you leave me no choice. I’ll have to make a call. You get my drift?” I think I spilled my coffee. There was a long moment of silence before Dominick couldn’t hold it in any longer, and roared with laughter. “Hey I’m just kidding. You should see the look on your face. C’mon, I’m just messing with you a little. C’mon.” He’s rubbing the tears in his eyes now and laughing almost uncontrollably. Midge shook her head. “He always kids around like this, pay no attention.” Dominick got up and went to the kitchen where I could hear him blowing his nose. He returned to the dining room, his laughter ebbing a bit, blowing a few more times into a napkin. “But seriously, tell me – the movie – What’s it gonna be like?”

 I had dined at the home of the Cataldo’s twice, and I had gotten away with evasive answers to any specific questions as to my cinematic approach to their project. A week before the wedding I was summoned to a meeting with Dominick and Cal, at the Villagio Italia, a restaurant in Ozone Park that Dominick owned a piece of. Until that night at the restaurant, I was still getting away with making it up as I went along. Dominick’s seemingly unbound confidence in my ability to make his movie had given me false courage.

 After we ate, Dominick took me from table to table, introducing me to his associates. “C’mon kid, I want you to meet some people.”

Shaun, this is my friend John Gotti. And Sammy, Sammy Gravano. Shaun, this is Sammy.

Shaun, this is my friend John Gotti. And Sammy, Sammy Gravano. Shaun, this is Sammy.

We approached a table where the occupants immediately stood up. Dominick obviously outranked them. “John, I want you to meet somebody. This is Shaun, my director. He’s gonna make the movie for Junior’s wedding. Shaun, this is my friend John Gotti. And Sammy, Sammy Gravano. Shaun this is Sammy.” They each shook my hand but made no eye contact with me, and gave me the pariah treatment, apparently wondering why Dominick was bringing a stranger in here, and introducing him to made guys who were not anxious to mingle with civilians. Gotti would become America’s favorite gangster years later, after his bloody takeover of the Gambino family, which would be engineered by his pal Gravano who himself, would seek asylum in the Federal Witness Protection Program, to escape the death sentence signed by his friend and tonight’s dinner companion, John Gotti. At the next table one man stood, but one remained seated, a sign of his rank. Dominick spoke to the seated man first. “Nino, I want you to meet somebody. You remember I told you I found a real film director to do Junior’s wedding movie, well this is the guy. Shaun, meet Nino Gaggi, a good friend of mine.”

Shaun, meet Nino Gaggi, a good friend of mine.

Shaun, meet Nino Gaggi, a good friend of mine.

Nino, like the others, never even looked at me. He offered his hand like a Bishop expecting his ring to be kissed. The man standing was friendlier, but pretty frightening. “Roy, Shaun meet Roy DeMeo. Me and Roy we go way back together.” At least DeMeo made eye contact, although I wished he hadn’t. Roy DeMeo, a Gambino associate, who owned some chop shops in the neighborhood, was out on bail, awaiting trial for several homicides. Five years later, in 1983 DeMeo, whose long string of grisly, and sometimes unnecessary murders would become an embarrassment to the Gambino’s, found himself expendable, and it would be Nino Gaggi, his friend and Capo, who would order the hit. They found him riddled with bullets in the trunk of his car.

Carmine,  sorry to intrude, but you gotta meet this guy. Shaun, I'm introducing you to Mr. Galante.

Carmine, sorry to intrude, but you gotta meet this guy. Shaun, I’m introducing you to Mr. Galante.

 Dominick was just getting warmed up, as we approached a table where all three men remained seated, obvious heavyweights. “Carmine, sorry to intrude, but you gotta meet this guy. Shaun, I’m introducing you to Mr. Galante.” He actually looked up at me and smiled, offering his hand, which I gladly shook. His sociable demeanor changed abruptly however, when Dominick let him know that I was the guy who was going to make the wedding movie, and he snapped his hand back like I had leprosy. The second seated gentleman was a bit friendlier. “Shaun, this is my good friend Sonny Black.” Sonny half stood for the handshake, and sat back down. “I’m telling you Sonny, it’s gonna be like a Hollywood production, the movie Shaun’s gonna make for me. I can’t wait for you to see it. Hey, you’ll probably be in it.” This news did not please Sonny Black, who looked at Dominick with unkind eyes. “And Joe, Shaun meet Joe Massino. It’s gonna be something Joe. Wait ‘til you see.” In less than a year, Carmine “Cigar” Galante, who had been whacking Gambino associates left and right, had his head half blown off by a shotgun blast at Joe and Mary’s Restaurant in Brooklyn, a lit cigar still dangling from his lips. Two years later, in 1981, Dominic ‘Sonny Black’ Napolitano would be held responsible for the ‘Donnie Brasco’ catastrophe. Brasco was the pseudonym for an FBI agent who would manage, befriended and encouraged by Sonny, to infiltrate the Bonanno family. It would be Joe Massino, by then an under-boss of the Bonanno’s, who would personally put five bullets in Sonny’s head. Massino would eventually disappear into Witness Protection, after ratting out his entire organization.

Dominic ‘Sonny Black’ Napolitano would be held responsible for the ‘Donnie Brasco’ catastrophe.

Dominic ‘Sonny Black’ Napolitano would be held responsible for the ‘Donnie Brasco’ catastrophe.

 The handshakes continued, from table to table, as Dominick spread the word throughout the room that Shaun was the guy who would be responsible for the success of his only son’s wedding, placing more importance on the movie of the wedding than on the wedding itself. “You know Shaun, the wedding is over in no time. I mean, you blink your eyes and you missed it. But this movie you’re gonna make for us, this movie is forever.” Shaun was the guy who would create a permanent chronicle to the sacred sacrament of matrimony that would be entered into by his only son, and his only son’s blessed and virginal bride-to-be, that could be viewed for years to come. “Let’s just say, some time in the future, I have to go away. I mean, these things happen. I could pull a few strings, get a VHS machine for my cell. I could watch the movie of the wedding while I’m in the can.” Shaun was the guy, in whose hands he was placing, the awesome task of recording for posterity his family’s most treasured moment. A moment that could not be shared by his wife’s frail mother who, as we speak, lies dying of cancer in a lonely hospital room, lingering on life support and unable to leave her bed, even to attend her grandson’s wedding. “Shaun, all that’s keeping this poor woman alive is the hope that she will live long enough to see your movie. She prays to God every day to give her the strength to last until she sees it. The Doctors say it’s a miracle that she’s still alive, a miracle.” His name is Shaun everybody, and if he fucks up, well, I hope you’ll all share my disappointment. I was being introduced, as accountable for the happiness or the unhappiness of Dominick’s entire family, to a room filled with murderers. And now they all knew my name. My mojo was on a slippery slope, sliding backwards into a pot of red clam sauce. I remembered back to that first handshake in The Casbah, reflected in all those mirrors, when I had thought to myself, ‘What the hell. I could do this. I could do this like I did everything else. I’ll just wing it, bluff my way through, and be saved at the bell by the Gods of risk’. The dining room at the Villagio Italia was beginning to spin. I was face down in a whirlpool, spinning and spinning. If a flirtation with oblivion was what I was after, I was certainly getting my money’s worth.

Having shaken the hand of every murderer within shouting distance, and dazed from facing the reality of the trouble I had gotten myself into, I was led by Dominick back to our table, where Cal Young was talking to someone I didn’t recognize. Dominick approached the table with outstretched arms. “Heyyyyyyy, look at this. Look who’s here.” Dominick and the new guy engaged in lots of hugging and kissing on the mouth, and shoulder slapping. ‘You son of a bitch, how you been? Hey Joe, you gotta meet somebody. Shaun, c’mere, meet my friend Joe Dogs. Joe, this is the guy whose gonna make Junior’s wedding movie. Shaun, this is my oldest friend in the world, meet Joe Dogs.” Joe, unlike most of the others in the room, shook my hand like he was actually glad to meet me, and we all sat down. Dominick got back up to handle some problem in the next room, and took Cal with him, leaving me alone at the table with Mr. Dogs. This was Joseph ‘Joe Dogs’ Iannuzzi who, unknown to his oldest friend in the world, had already agreed to work as an FBI informant and, a week from now, would wear a ‘wire’ to the wedding reception. “So you’re gonna make Dom’s movie huh? Do yourself a favor. Don’t fuck up.”

“So you’re gonna make Dom’s movie huh? Do yourself a favor. Don’t fuck up.”

“So you’re gonna make Dom’s movie huh? Do yourself a favor. Don’t fuck up.”

With the wedding only a week away, it was time to figure out a way to do this thing, and fast. The problem was that I knew nothing about video. In those days nobody did. But I had a friend who had been fooling around with portable video for a while now. He would be a risky choice but, considering the situation, my options were limited. His name was Steve DeVita, and we had worked together on several film projects, mostly porn. He worked as an assistant cameraman, but also did some lighting and, on a film crew, was a jack-of-all-trades. Steve had a visionary’s insight into the future importance of video tape, and had been spending time interviewing odd characters around the city, using his then-primitive black and white video rig. So I made the call. He told me that we could rent, for a few hundred dollars, a small, portable color video system that would probably do the trick, but that we should shoot as much as possible outside in sunlight. These cameras were not terribly light sensitive, and anything shot indoors without proper lighting would be marginal at best. So far, so good. At least I now knew there was a way to do this, and that Steve would help, although I would have to pay him something. The problem with Steve was that he was always fiddling with the equipment. Gerry-rigging electronics, and adjusting the lights, sometimes when the camera was rolling. Of course we’d have to stop the shot. “Steve, what the hell are you doing?” “Making it better. Wait ‘til you see.” He just couldn’t help himself, but he was pretty low in the food-chain, and not really accountable for his erratic behavior. I was at the top, and if something went wrong, I was the one who would be devoured by the backer, the guy who put up the money. Steve only had to answer to me, and I was easy. I was very leery of involving a guy who couldn’t help himself on something like this, but I didn’t have much of a choice.

The problem was that I knew nothing about video. In those days nobody did.

The problem was that I knew nothing about video. In those days nobody did.

I needed someone dependable to offset Steve’s volatility, so I called Maryse Alberti. She worked as a still photographer, but was the savviest person on a film set that I had ever known. No matter how complicated the shot, or how big the crew, she always knew where everything and everyone was supposed to be, and could solve a problem before I knew it existed. She was French, and compact, and lively, and cute, and I had come to depend on having her around. She would say things to me in her thick but adorable accent like, “Eh boss, you pay me cash uh?” When I told her that the wedding reception would be attended by the Mafia Allstars, she squealed. I just loved Maryse.

So now I had a crew, and the equipment to do the job. I called Cal Young and told him that he would have to cover the cost of the video equipment rental, and a few hundred bucks each, for Steve and Maryse. If I was doing the ‘favor’ then he should pay the bills. He squirmed a little, but agreed. He also had a message from Dominick. “Dom called me last night. The guy is totally flipping out. He had to go back to the street, and borrow more from the shy’s. This thing is costing him double what he thought. He told me to talk to you. Remind you about what he said, you know, about being at the groom’s house, and the bride’s house, early, like eight in the morning. You’ve got to be there early”. It was the first thing Dominick ever said to me, back that night at the Casbah, reflected in all those mirrors. “You shoot both houses.” Cal was still on the line. “Oh, and one more thing. Dom say’s this is really important. As the Bride and Groom exit the Church, after the ceremony is over, outside on the steps, there will be a flock of doves.” This was the first I had heard about this. “Cal, what doves?” “How do I know what doves? Doves. Something to do with the virginity of the bride. Hey, I’m a Jew. I don’t know from this. You Goyim do some pretty weird shit, you know that?” This was not good news. “Look Cal, it’s one thing to say there will be doves, and another thing to photograph the fucking things in the same shot with the happy Bride and Groom. You’re going to need a bird wrangler. Who is going to do this? Who is going to release these things?” Cal was not being helpful. “I don’t know. Maybe Fat Mike. I think it’s Fat Mike.” As though I didn’t have enough to worry about. “Cal, suppose the birds shit all over the happy couple, or just fly away. Then what do we do?” Like birds are going to cooperate. “You know something Shaun, you worry too much. So there will be some doves. So what.”

Despite this new wrinkle, I was feeling pretty confident now. It was all coming together somehow, doves or no doves. The houses at Eight, the Church at Noon, and the reception, which was in Brooklyn, at Six. No Problem.

The night before the big event I got to bed early since I had to be up at Five. I would meet Maryse at Steve’s apartment on the upper West Side at Six, where we would sort out the equipment, drink some coffee, and head out to Valley Stream. It was a leisurely, doable schedule. I called Steve before hitting the sack, and he was happy. He had picked up the equipment that afternoon, and tested everything. The batteries were all on charge, the camera and deck worked well, we were ready. “Yeah, it’s all OK. I’m just fooling with viewfinder a little bit. Making it better”. He just couldn’t help himself. “Steve, please. Promise me you won’t do anything stupid. Leave the camera alone and get some sleep.” I could hear him fidgeting with something on the other end. “Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, don’t worry. Everything’s OK.” Easy for him to say. He never shook hands with ‘Murderer’s Row’.

I had done it. Everything was ready. I had taken the ultimate risk and gotten away with it. I had pushed the envelope into a new shape – waited until the last minute to solve the unsolvable – went one-on-one with the Cosa Nostra and lived to tell the tale. I began to have fantasies of Frank Sinatra making a surprise visit to tomorrow’s reception, like Frankie Fontaine in “The Godfather”. It would make Dominick so happy. “Frank, I can’t believe you came. What a surprise. C’mon and say hello to the family. And Frank, this is Shaun, my director. He’s making my movie.” I was quite pleased with myself, as I drifted off to a happy sleep. Life was good.

And Frank, this is Shaun, my director. He’s making my movie.”

And Frank, this is Shaun, my director. He’s making my movie.”

I was five minutes early when an ashen-faced Maryse Alberti opened the door to Steve’s apartment. We stood there for a moment, just looking at each other, Steve’s voice jabbering incoherently somewhere off in the background. “You better come in Boss.” She led me down the hallway that opened into Steve’s living room. He was on his knees, surrounded by tools and pieces of what had once been a video camera, staring at the whole disassembled mess, attempting unsuccessfully to fit parts together, and squawking gibberish. “I didn’t do anything. I didn’t do it. I was fixing it. I took the screws out. It was the viewfinder – it didn’t work right. Just a small adjustment. I took the screws out. It’s not my fault. Everything went kerflouey. I just took the screws out. Oh God – I can fix it – I know I can fix it. I looked at the schematics. I checked first – before I did any thing – I checked first. It’s not my fault. You can’t blame me for this. It’s not my fault.” He was out of control – completely hysterical. He obviously had not slept. What little hair he had was all-askew, and his face was noticeably unshaven. He had been up all night trying to fix the mess he had made out of the camera. His eyes were wild, searching for some kind of solution that just wasn’t there. I looked up at Maryse, who slowly shook her head. “We’ve got to call somebody”, I pleaded. “Eh boss, it’s Six o’clock on Saturday morning, Who we gonna call?”

I needed to think this through. Steve was sleepless, and useless in his present state. Maryse, ever-able, just needed orders to follow, but I couldn’t provide any. I needed to think. “OK. Here’s what we’re going to do. Steve, Steve, listen to me.” He was reeling. “I need you to get cleaned up. Get in the shower. Shave your face. Eat something.” I wasn’t sure that I was getting through to him. “Just do it. Maryse, I’m going out. I need to think. I’ll be back in fifteen minutes. Just make sure Steve does what I told him.” “OK boss.”

I walked around the block twice, thinking this through, trying to come up with options, like I had any. It was 6:20. We had an hour and forty minutes to find another camera and get out to Valley Stream, where the Bride’s party, and the Groom’s party expected a video crew to tape their pre-nuptial frolics. Back up in Steve’s apartment I went into boss mode. “OK, here’s what we’re going to do. Get out your address books, and the yellow pages too. Let’s go through everyone we know who might either have, or who might know somebody whose got a video camera. Write down all the names and numbers, make lists. Forget that it’s early, we’re going to call everybody we know.” There was only one phone line at Steve’s so I woke up a bewildered Cal Young, and told him to expect a short French girl on his doorstep, and gave Maryse the cab fare. “OK boss.” Our chances were slim, but I had to do something. The clock was ticking.

7:15 and still no camera. We were half way through our list of possibilities. Video rental companies, who might or might not be open on a Saturday, would not pick up the phone until Nine or Nine Thirty. “You shoot both houses.” That’s what Dominick had said. Those were his first words to me, and it was not going to happen.

8:30 and still no camera. It’s now thirty minutes past “Both Houses”. Cal calls. He’s beside himself. “You’ve got to call Dominic. Let him know what’s going on.” Like that’s going to do any good. “Look Cal, the wedding is at Noon, and I don’t have a camera. That’s what we’re focused on now. The early stuff is over. It’s history. The wedding is all we can think about now. Just do what you planned to do, and somehow we’ll meet you out there.” I could hear him breathing on the other end. “Oh God.”

9:30 and still no camera. Cal had left Maryse still working the phone at his apartment, and was on his way out to Dominick’s house. Video rental companies were not answering the phone on a Saturday morning. We just kept calling, it was all we could do. At 10:20 Steve’s phone rang. It was Maryse. “Eh boss, I got it.”

It was 10:45 and the three of us were in my car racing down the East River Drive toward the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel.

It was 10:45 and the three of us were in my car racing down the East River Drive toward the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel.

It was 10:45 and the three of us were in my car racing down the East River Drive toward the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel. The camera she found belonged to some twerpy video buff, who lived on Eastern Parkway, out in Brooklyn. There had been a copy of Popular Photography on Cal’s coffee table and an ever-alert Maryse dove into the classifieds and found an ad that read: MISTER VIDEO can make your Bar Mitzvah live forever, call Zvi, and his phone number. It was a different brand than the camera that Steve had destroyed but was similar enough, and would do just fine. Maryse had told Mister Video to make sure he put the batteries on charge, and that we would be there, to pick everything up, in thirty minutes. His name was Zvi Herzog, and it was now 11:05 on Saturday morning.

As we followed the numbers along Eastern Parkway, looking for Zvi’s address, it was becoming obvious that we were now deep inside a seriously Jewish neighborhood. Not just Jewish, but very Jewish. Not just very Jewish, more than that, more than even orthodox Jewish.

We were in the belly of the beast. A block from the Lubavicher Synagogue, the very center of the Hasidic Jewish community, and it was the Sabbath.

We were in the belly of the beast. A block from the Lubavicher Synagogue, the very center of the Hasidic Jewish community, and it was the Sabbath.

We were in the belly of the beast. A block from the Lubavicher Synagogue, the very center of the Hasidic Jewish community, and it was the Sabbath. Up and down Eastern Parkway, all the men who were not presently worshipping in the Temple could be seen on the side walks, dressed in black overcoats and prayer shawls, their dark ear locks bobbi-pinned to their yarmulke’s, reading their little prayer books and davening rhythmically as they prayed. Bending forward at the waist, and straightening, bending and straightening, over and over, moving their lips in prayer, bobbing up and down. Hundreds of them. It was hypnotic.

Bending forward at the waist, and straightening, bending and straightening, over and over, moving their lips in prayer, bobbing up and down. Hundreds of them. It was hypnotic.

Bending forward at the waist, and straightening, bending and straightening, over and over, moving their lips in prayer, bobbing up and down. Hundreds of them. It was hypnotic.

“There it is”, Maryse had seen Zvi’s address, and her voice brought me out of my momentary trance. It was a four story brick building, over an electronics store that was of course closed for the Sabbath.  Steve waited in the double-parked car, while Maryse and I looked for the doorway, which we found to the left of the store.  I pressed the button next to Herzog. Nothing. I pressed it again. Still nothing. Maryse looked at me. “It’s 11:15 boss”. We returned to the sidewalk, our backs to the street and looked up, and there he was, Zvi Herzog, sticking his head out a second story window, with his finger to his lips to shush us. He spoke in a stage whisper. “They won’t let me answer the door bell.” He was looking up and down the street, making sure this conversation went unnoticed by the hundreds of men in prayer shawls who were davening everywhere. He was a kid, maybe eighteen, his ear locks bobbi-pinned to his yamulke like the others. I needed him to focus. “Zvi, the camera, we need the camera. We’re in kind of a hurry. Why can’t you answer the door bell?” His finger was still at his lips. “Shhhhh, are you kidding? It’s Shabbis. My parents would kill me.” I could feel Maryse’s impatience next to me. “It’s 11:20 boss.” I was running out of time. “Look Zvi please, we need to rent your camera. We’re running really late. People are waiting for us. I have the money right here for you.” He shushed me again and turned to Maryse.

“Wow, this is so cool, I’ve never met a real French person before. I took two years of French in High School”. I’m dying here.

“Wow, this is so cool, I’ve never met a real French person before. I took two years of French in High School”. I’m dying here.

“Hey, are you the one I spoke to on the phone? Are you Maryse?” She nodded. “Are you from France?” She nodded again and stage-whispered up to him, “Yes, I’m from France.” “Wow, this is so cool, I’ve never met a real French person before. I took two years of French in High School”. I’m dying here. “Hey, maybe some time, would you have a coffee with me? We could speak French to each other.” Maryse’s mouth was locked in a frozen smile, as she continued to nod up at Zvi, and without her lips moving I could hear, “It’s 11:30 boss”. And she pleaded with him. “Zvi please, we are so late. Tomorrow we can speak French, but today we need your camera. Please.” He shushed us again. “Ok”, he said and disappeared into his window, reappearing a moment later with an aluminum camera case. He had fastened a rope to the handle and lowered it down to us. Maryse quickly opened the case and looked up at me and nodded. “What about the Money?”, I whispered up to him. “It’s Ok. Pay me later. I can’t take money now, it’s Shabbis. I trust you.” I was stunned. “Zvi, You don’t even know us. Why do you trust us?” Zvi shushed me again, and looked at me like I had just asked the dumbest question he had ever heard, and then looked at Maryse. “Why wouldn’t I trust her. She’s from France.”

Steve sorted through the equipment, inserting batteries, and connecting cables into and out of Zvi Herzog’s camera, as I broke every traffic law on the books, speeding franticly toward Lynbrook, and Our Lady of Lourdes Church, where the wedding was to take place, and where a justifiably furious Dominick Cataldo was probably contemplating stuffing my battered remains in the trunk of a Chevy. And all I could think of was Joe Dogs saying, “So you’re gonna make Dom’s movie huh? Do yourself a favor. Don’t Fuck up.”

Having rehearsed our arrival at the Church, we jumped out of the car like we had been there all along. “Just don’t act like you’re anxious. Stay calm. Be casual, like we’ve been working for hours. I’m going to whisper camera direction to you Steve, and you’re going to get the shots. Slowly, calmly, like we’ve been here all day. Steve? Steve?” “Yeah, yeah, yeah, I’m good.” He was drifting, and I had to keep him focused. “Remember, like we’ve been here all along. Ready? Ok, let’s go.” Maryse took the car to find a place to park, and Steve and I, camera at the ready,  casually slipped in the side door to the Church.

Maryse took the car to find a place to park, and Steve and I, camera at the ready,  casually slipped in the side door to the Church.

Maryse took the car to find a place to park, and Steve and I, camera at the ready, casually slipped in the side door to the Church.

The smell inside the building, the frankincense and myrrh, it never changes, especially to recovering Catholics. And the sounds, bouncing off the stone walls, someone coughs and it’s a full second before the sound decays and disappears into the din of a hundred seated parishioners, fidgeting and shuffling in their pews, waiting for something to happen. It was ten minutes after Twelve. The wedding was getting a late start, thank God. It was important to make our presence noticed, but only just. Quietly, we worked our pre-rehearsed routine around the outside aisles, aiming the camera at wedding guests, walking slowly, communicating as we went, with the same stage whispers we had used in Brooklyn with Zvi Herzog. “Stay wide Steve. Just track past everyone. Nice and slow. Nice and slow. That’s it. How does it look?” Steve was grimacing into the viewfinder. “Yeah, Yeah, looks good. This is nice.”

 And so we went, whispering and shooting, quietly but there, up and down the aisles, getting everyone in our shots, being noticed, being involved, part of the family. I made eye contact with Midge Cataldo, who quickly looked away toward a statue of a bleeding Jesus, holding his heart in his hand. She couldn’t look at me, not a good sign. Hard to make eye contact with a condemned man.  Steve’s spare eye, the one not glued to the viewfinder, kept finding me, and I knew what he was saying. It’s too dark. I’m not getting anything. To the naked eye, the inside of the Church looked as it should, but to the little video camera that Steve was pointing at everything, we might as well have been shooting in a cave. But we had to press on, like everything was fine. What choice did we have?

The smell inside the building, the frankincense and myrrh, it never changes, especially to recovering Catholics.

The smell inside the building, the frankincense and myrrh, it never changes, especially to recovering Catholics.

We wandered out through the front doors, shooting as we went, trying to be noticed, and a surprising number of men were standing around outside the church, dressed in dark suits, smoking cigarettes, and holding umbrellas, it had started to rain. Back inside everything seemed ready, but out here in the soft shower, there was a sense of nervous anticipation. The cast of characters was not yet complete. They were all waiting for the arrival of the father of the groom. Forty well-dressed, slightly soggy, umbrella wielding wiseguys stood ready to surge forward and protect the great man from the rain. And we were there to get it all on tape.

After a minute or two, the longest super-stretch Cadillac Limousine imaginable turned the corner, and slowly glided toward the curb.

After a minute or two, the longest super-stretch Cadillac Limousine imaginable turned the corner, and slowly glided toward the curb.

 After a minute or two, the longest super-stretch Cadillac Limousine imaginable turned the corner, and slowly glided toward the curb. It was all white, and glistened in the rain shower. As the car came to a stop, a phalanx of dark suits, rushed forward, their umbrellas extended in a collective gesture of protective solidarity, forming a canopy over the door to the enormous car, and the door opened. Out slid a dapper Dominick Cataldo, wearing a beautifully tailored suit, a white carnation in his lapel, and adjusting his tie knot as he greeted his loyal cadre. The whole umbrella-wielding protectorate, a smiling Cataldo at its center, moved forward as one, propelled by the sotto voce undercurrent of congratulatory murmurs, from the gang to the boss, on this blessed day in his life. It was a performance Dominick was born for, gracefully accepting the adoration of his underlings, as he strutted toward the steps of the Church. The rain had stopped now, and the canopy of protection disappeared, as Dominick skipped up the steps alone, leaving his fans behind. As he reached the top, he slowly turned and, looking directly at me, with an unmistakable malevolence, raised his right hand to his mouth and bit the knuckle of his clenched index finger, then turned and entered the Church. There was a muted gasp from the crowd behind me.

Steve, who was bent down, attached to the camera’s view finder, and had just taped this moment, looked up at me. “Jesus Christ”. I looked around, and the small army of well-dressed, umbrella-wielding wiseguys had disappeared, some into the Church, and some to stand guard duty at various points around the block. Maryse was standing a few feet away just staring at me. “Eh boss, what are we gonna do?”  There wasn’t really much of a choice. So we went back into the Church to video-tape the wedding. That’s why we came.

From the side aisle we were able to tape Dominick, as he slid into the pew next to his wife and, once he was seated, there was an anticipatory buzz from the congregation, knowing the ceremony was near. Suddenly there was a swarm of alter boys all over the church’s proscenium, like ball boys at Wimbledon, lighting candles and prepping the stage for the arrival of the priest. And it all happened quickly now; the entrance of the Bride and Groom, the chanted Latin of the Wedding Mass Ritual, the Priest placing the sacred wafers on the extended tongues of the congregation’s willing recipients – most noticeably the Bride and Groom – and the Bride’s Maids and Groom’s Party all finding their proper places down in front of the alter. “You got that Steve?” “Yeah, Yeah, it’s beautiful, really nice.” Just loud enough for the father of the groom to hear, in the hope that he might find it in his heart to forgive me for ruining his life. Fat Chance.

The Church’s organ provided background music, while Steve and I, traversing the ceremony in a united crouch, continued our routine, knowing all the while that, considering the amount of light inside that building, we had probably not recorded a single usable moment of video tape. And then it happened. As the Bride and Groom stood before God, awaiting the recitation of their vows, and Steve and I tried our best to be noticed recording it all, there was an small puff of smoke, and an odd smell, like burning rubber. Steve turned and looked at me with a crazed expression on his face, like a hyena on amphetamines. Between the thumb and fingers of his left hand he was holding what was left of the cable that had once connected the camera to the recording deck. It had shorted out and melted. It was over now. Our survival was the only issue.

The three of us squatted together on the floor behind the last pew, and we could clearly hear the Priest’s voice bouncing off the stone walls, “Do you Angela Molinari take this man….” We had to fake it. Pretend we were shooting. And we had to begin right now. I turned to Maryse. “You should get on the train and get out of here. Steve and I will stay.” “No boss, I stay with you.” I could have cried. So now we continued our whispering and shooting routine with no cable. Nothing was being recorded. Survival was the only objective. The show must go on.

And so Junior and Angela, with love in their eyes, kissed and were wed, in front of God, their adoring parents and friends, and three terrified people who were trying to somehow live out the day.

And so Junior and Angela, with love in their eyes, kissed and were wed, in front of God, their adoring parents and friends, and three terrified people who were trying to somehow live out the day.

And so Junior and Angela, with love in their eyes, kissed and were wed, in front of God, their adoring parents and friends, and three terrified people who were trying to somehow live out the day. As the now-married couple stood at the alter huddling with the Priest, the guests made a bee line for the front of the Church, where they would all congregate outside to participate in the ritual of rice throwing,  which would insure good luck and healthy children to the newlyweds as they exited the building. Outside with the crowd, Steve and I looked for a spot to get the best ‘make believe’ shot of the happy couple. “Steve, what do you think? What about from here?” I wondered of we were fooling anybody. “Yeah, yeah, yeah, this is good, from right here.” Not that it mattered. We were dead meat, in any case.

Everyone was outside the Church now, including Dominick and Midge, holding bags of rice and waiting for Junior and Angela. Out to the left, peering around the corner of the building, I noticed a very short, and very fat little man, who seemed to be trying not to be noticed. He was maybe five foot five, but probably weighed three hundred pounds. His suit was shiny and black and looked to be two sizes too small. Either that or his fat body was just larger than any known suit size for someone his height. He was holding something I couldn’t make out. He would disappear and then reappear, peeking around the corner of the building. What was he up to?

The first chords of the Recessional from Mendelssohn’s Wedding March sounded as Angela and Junior appeared in the doorway, and the little fat guy in the black suit took a few steps forward. I could now make out a bag of some kind that he was holding. A burlap bag. The familiar music continued, and the happy couple began to walk toward the steps that led down to the crowd, who stood ready with rice in hand. The fat man was on the move now, picking up his pace, and holding the burlap bag in front of him. What was this guy doing? Then it hit me. ‘Good Christ, it’s Fat Mike and the doves’. I grabbed Steve. “Steve, you’ve got to get this. Don’t ask, just do it. Get the camera on the couple. Do it now. Just pretend, for Christ sake.” Everything now happened in slow motion. Fat Mike, a graceful mover for a man his size, had shifted his portly presence into third gear, and was almost there. Angela and Junior had reached the top of the steps, Angela extending her right foot to begin her descent, just as Fat Mike flew past the couple, while violently shaking his burlap bag, and emptying its contents directly in their path. Her momentum carried Angela forward, and her right foot downward, until it came to rest squarely in the center of something soft and wet. Fat Mike had dumped, directly at Angela’s feet, a dozen dead pigeons in an advanced state of decomposition, and Angela had stepped directly into one of them, squirting pigeon intestines riddled with maggots up her right leg. And she was suddenly very still, just standing there looking down, surrounded by dead, maggot-infested birds, as Fat Mike disappeared around the far corner of the building, and Angela began to scream. It had all happened so quickly that the crowd hadn’t quite grasped the horrible reality of the moment. But there they were, a dozen dead birds, right there on the Church steps, flies buzzing all around, and Angela standing above them, her right leg dripping with unspeakable, crushed pigeon bowel and wiggling maggots, as a hundred mouths now gasped in horror, and Angela just kept screaming, until finally Dominick threw a handful of rice over his hysterical daughter-in-law and shouted, “Hey let’s hear it for the happy couple. C’mon everybody, give it up.” And slowly but surely the crowd, those who were not attempting to revive Loretta Molinari, Angela’s grandmother, who had fainted dead-away at the sight of the maggots, began in ones and twos, to half-heartedly throw rice, until they gained some momentum, and genuine cheering began. The priest, who had come out of the Church in answer to the screaming Bride, put his arm around a bug-eyed, gasping Angela, who violently sobbed as he led her back into the building. And, at the bottom of the steps, stood Dominick Cataldo’s video crew, who had just convincingly pretended to capture the whole extraordinary event on tape, for the viewing pleasure of future generations of Cataldos.

And she was suddenly very still, just standing there looking down, surrounded by dead, maggot-infested birds, as Fat Mike disappeared around the far corner of the building, and Angela began to scream.

And she was suddenly very still, just standing there looking down, surrounded by dead, maggot-infested birds, as Fat Mike disappeared around the far corner of the building, and Angela began to scream.

You would think that this kind of carnage would take a long time to dissipate, but that was not to be the case. Within what seemed like only seconds, almost everyone had disappeared. Dominick and his family into the Church to comfort the sobbing Angela, and the rice throwing, gasping crowd into their cars and away from this sorry scene as quickly as they could go. A small group of maybe five or six nephews and cousins remained to help Angela’s still-moaning grandmother onto the gurney provided by a local hospital. And once the ambulance left the curb, they too, quickly disappeared.

This left me alone at the steps of the Church, along with Steve and Maryse. Alone with the decaying carcasses of Fat Mike’s dead pigeons, and the swarm of flies, buzzing all around us. What we had just witnessed was so far beyond anyone’s ability to comprehend that there was no point in discussing it. We got back in the car, and found a local Diner on Sunrise Highway. No one said anything, we just ate.

Regardless of the catastrophic events of the last hour, the day was not yet over, and some kind of strategy had to be developed. The enormous reception at ‘La Mer’, in Brooklyn, that Dominick had borrowed so heavily from the shylock’s to finance, would still take place. Guests had been invited from all over the Country, and more than that, it had all been paid for. Over two hundred members; Associates, Capo’s, and Bosses, as well as their families, would begin arriving around 6PM, and we had to either renew our commitment to this bizarre enterprise, or figure some way out of it. I’d be lying here if I didn’t admit to trying to think of a way out. Was there somewhere I could hide until the banks opened on Monday morning, and I could withdraw enough money to live out my days in some third world country, hoping to go undiscovered by Dominick’s relentless predators? Could I talk my way out of this? Maryse, as always, had the answer. “It’s OK boss. The fat guy with the birds. He’s in big trouble, but you’ll be OK.” Let’s hope.

La Mer was an enormous, glitzy catering facility on Ocean Parkway, in the Gravesend section of Brooklyn, a name that seemed appropriate, considering.

La Mer was an enormous, glitzy catering facility on Ocean Parkway, in the Gravesend section of Brooklyn, a name that seemed appropriate, considering.

La Mer was an enormous, glitzy catering facility on Ocean Parkway, in the Gravesend section of Brooklyn, a name that seemed appropriate, considering. Zvi Herzog had opened up his father’s Electronics store, and replaced the melted cable, at what he assured us was a wholesale price, and we were back in business. There was still a full hour before the guests would be arriving, and the lobby was a hubbub of last-minute primping, and polishing, and flower arranging, the whirring sound of vacuum cleaners, and clinking of glasses and dishes seemed everywhere. We found a bench off to the side, out of everyone’s way, dumped our equipment, and just waited, I’m not sure for what, but it didn’t take long. Out of a doorway, on the far side of the lobby, stepped a grim Joe Dogs Iannuzzi, who motioned to me. I told Steve and Maryse to stay put, and crossed the lobby.

He led me down a long, noisy, hallway, somewhere in the bowels of the building, where we ducked fast moving busboys carrying endless trays of glassware and dishes.

He led me down a long, noisy, hallway, somewhere in the bowels of the building, where we ducked fast moving busboys carrying endless trays of glassware and dishes.

He led me down a long, noisy, hallway, somewhere in the bowels of the building, where we ducked fast moving busboys carrying endless trays of glassware and dishes. “You just don’t listen do you?” I could hardly hear him through the din and clatter. “What did I tell you? Huh? What did I tell you?” He stopped and turned around. “I told you not to fuck up. And what did you do?” He was really pissed. “I fucked up.” He stuck his finger in my face. “Don’t you get smart with me.” “I’m not being smart Joe, I’m being honest. I fucked up.” He turned, and started walking again, and I struggled to keep up. “You’re in a bad spot, my friend. You watch your mouth. It was supposed to be a good day, and look what happened. Where the fuck were you this morning? Don’t open your mouth.” He stopped and turned to me, with his finger in my face again. “Don’t open your mouth. Do you hear me? Not one fucking word. You wanna live to see tomorrow? Not one fucking word.” We continued the march down the hallway. “I’ve never seen him this mad. Never. He likes you, but you’re in a bad spot kid.” He pushed a door open and started to climb a flight of stairs, still ducking between the trays of dishes that were going both up and down, and me right behind him. He stopped on the landing, and turned again. “Everything depends on you keeping your mouth shut. No matter what he say’s. He’ll try to provoke you. Don’t let him. Don’t say a fucking thing. At this point, anything will set him off. He likes you. At some point he’ll remember that he likes you. Just don’t say a word, no matter what. You got it?” I nodded.

We found Dominick in a storeroom, somewhere off the far side of the kitchen. He was pacing and smoking, and he was frantic. When he saw me his eyes focused and became smaller. Angry eyes. Hateful eyes. “You! You strunz. What did I tell you? What did I say? The first thing I said. Both houses. You shoot both houses. You stupid fuck. You don’t even show up. You don’t even call.” The veins in his neck were bulging, and pulsating with the blood that was rushing to his head. He was close to exploding. He was incendiary. “My wife is crying. The kids are going crazy. ‘Where is he? Where is he?’ You fuck. You shoulda called me. You shoulda been a man. You fuck.” He lit another cigarette. “Did you see what happened? What that fat fuck did? Bird shit on her leg. Dead fucking bird shit. On her wedding day. On her leg, on her wedding day. It was supposed to be beautiful. White doves, symbolizing the innocence of the bride. Beautiful. And what do I get? Dead fucking pigeons, that’s what I get. I’m in hock up to my eyeballs on this thing, and I get dead fucking pigeons.” I was starting to fear for Fat Mike.

“Do you know what that fat jerk-off did? I gave him two hundred bucks. I said go to a pet store. Get some doves. He tells me, ‘Boss, I don’t know from birds’. I tell him to just get the doves, and bring them to the wedding. I don’t want any excuses. You know what that fat scumbag does? He takes the money and blows it at the track. My money. Blows it. So what does he do now? He goes to the park, and starts catching pigeons. Pigeons. I don’t know how he catches them, but he catches them. Throws them in a burlap bag. Disgusting, disease ridden pigeons. For my wedding. And when he’s got a dozen, he ties a string around the bag, and throws it in the trunk of his car. They were in the trunk of that fat fuck’s car for a week. A week. Dead and rotting for a week. Fucking moron. We got him locked up downstairs. That tub of guts is in deep shit. You saw what happened at the Church. It was supposed to be beautiful. And what do I get? You gotta help me here Shaun.” He was cooling down, Maybe Maryse was right. Maybe I would be OK. He wanted me to help him. All I could do was listen.

“The video from the Church, it’s got to go. This is an embarrassment I could never live down. The people who saw it, they’re family, they’re friends. They won’t say anything. But you got it all on video. The bird shit going up her leg. The poor girl screaming and all. On her Wedding day. This is terrible.” He was calming down now, almost pleading. “Look, I know how this works. I read up on it. The video of the dead birds is connected to the rest. There’s nothing we can do. You just get rid of it. All of it. No one can ever see it. Destroy the evidence. Everything from the Church. You do that for me and we’re square.” I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. He didn’t understand about editing, and now he would never know the full extent of my crimes. Steve destroying the first camera. All the unusable footage from inside that dark Church. The melted cable. All the pretending. The Gods of risk-takers had somehow come to my rescue. All my sins forgiven.  I had been saved by a burlap bag filled with Fat Mike’s dead pigeons. “You just video the party tonight. People dancing and having fun. That’s what the movie will be, a big party. That’s OK. That’s good. And nobody will ever know what happened.”

“Carmine Persico, they call him the ‘Snake’. He’s in prison, but he still heard about it, about the video. Dom got rapped on the knuckles.

“Carmine Persico, they call him the ‘Snake’. He’s in prison, but he still heard about it, about the video. Dom got rapped on the knuckles.

An hour later, as we were getting ready to video the reception line that was now forming in the lobby to greet the guests, Cal Young appeared. “It’s a wrap.” We just stared at him. “The shoot has been called off. The Snake found out and said no cameras.” The question needed to be asked. “The Snake?” My ignorance bewildered Cal. “Carmine Persico, they call him the ‘Snake’. He’s in prison, but he still heard about it, about the video. Dom got rapped on the knuckles. Important people will be here tonight, and the Snake say’s no cameras. Persico is the Boss of the Colombo family, in case you don’t know. Dom’s Boss. He got the call from Gerry Lang, he’s the Underboss who runs things while Carmine is in the can. Hey, why the sad faces? You guys aren’t workers anymore, you’re guests. You sit at the table with me and Joe Dogs. Dom say’s he wants you to stay and have fun.”

 The Gambino’s were the first Family through the line. Paul Castellano, the recently annointed ‘Boss’, followed by Annielo DeLacroce, Robert ‘Dibi’ BiBernardo, John Gotti, Sammy ‘Bull’ Gravano, and several more, all greeted by Dominick, who passed them on to Midge, and then on down the line until they kissed the eager lips of Junior and Angela.

The Gambino’s were the first Family through the line. Paul Castellano, the recently annointed ‘Boss’, followed by Annielo DeLacroce, Robert ‘Dibi’ BiBernardo, John Gotti, Sammy ‘Bull’ Gravano, and several more, all greeted by Dominick, who passed them on to Midge, and then on down the line until they kissed the eager lips of Junior and Angela.

And so the who’s-who of organized crime in America found its way through the reception line, shaking the hands, and kissing the lips of the Cataldos and the Molinaris, who greeted them with an eager appreciation of their presence at this unique gathering. First Dominick, who was in his glory, “Paul, I’m so honored you’re here. You know Midge. Honey, You remember Paul Castellano.” The Gambino’s were the first Family through the line. Paul Castellano, the recently annointed ‘Boss’, followed by Annielo DeLacroce, Robert ‘Dibi’ BiBernardo, John Gotti, Sammy ‘Bull’ Gravano, and several more, all greeted by Dominick, who passed them on to Midge, and then on down the line until they kissed the eager lips of Junior and Angela. The Genovese contingent was next with Big Mike Miranda leading the way, closely followed by Phil Lombardo, Vinnie ‘Chin’ Gigante, and the others. And then the Bonanno’s, and the Colombo’s, and finally the Lucchese’s new boss Anthony ‘Tony Ducks’ Corallo, and his lieutenants. Cal Young whispered the play by play to me, identifying the celebrated Mafiosi, as we stood off to the side of the lobby. “Enjoy it while you can kid. This has never happened before, not in my lifetime. Not like this. Jesus, everybody’s here.”

 The Genovese contingent was next with Big Mike Miranda leading the way, closely followed by Phil Lombardo, Vinnie ‘Chin’ Gigante, and the others. And then the Bonanno’s, and the Colombo’s, and finally the Lucchese’s new boss Anthony ‘Tony Ducks’ Corallo, and his lieutenants.

The Genovese contingent was next with Big Mike Miranda leading the way, closely followed by Phil Lombardo, Vinnie ‘Chin’ Gigante, and the others. And then the Bonanno’s, and the Colombo’s, and finally the Lucchese’s new boss Anthony ‘Tony Ducks’ Corallo, and his lieutenants.

At the other end of the reception line was the entrance to La Mer’s Grand Ballroom, where the orchestra was playing a medley of Broadway Show tunes, with an occasional Tarantella thrown in for good measure. Our table seated eight, but there were only five of us; myself, Steve, Maryse, and Cal Young right next to an unusually quiet Joe Dogs. Years later I would find out that Joe, who had been caught red-handed with a kilo of heroin, and had made a deal with the FBI, was wearing a wire that night. Parked in a van, out on Ocean Parkway, were two Federal Agents, who were recording and listening to every word spoken to and by Joe Dogs Iannuzzi.

The dinner was typical catering fare; tough veal, thin steaks, chicken smothered in some kind of sauce, but nobody seemed to either notice or mind very much. Their family and friends had come to celebrate Junior and Angela’s marriage, and the businessmen, some two hundred strong, were there to participate in meetings and confabs between all of the Families attending; settling old disputes, redefining their territorial boundaries, discussing new opportunities, and plotting defensive measures against an aggressive Justice Department, and something new called the Rico Statute. And then there was Joe Dogs, perhaps having second thoughts about his betrayal, who stayed to himself, keeping a safe distance between the business being discussed and the microphone that no one knew he was wearing.

After the dinner, the orchestra seemed to kick into another gear and, among those here for Junior and Angela, dancing became the thing. Maryse, who could find fun on the dark side of the moon, grabbed me. “C’mon boss, dance with me.” But Joe Dogs interceded. “No, you go dance Miss. He needs to talk with me for a minute.” This left me alone with Joe. “No dancing tonight. It’s a thing. You’re going to meet some people tonight. It’s business. No dancing.” This was an odd development. “What do you mean Joe? What people?” Something was obviously bothering him. “I can’t talk about it. Not now anyway. Talk to Cal. Maybe he can fill you in.” Out on the dance floor, a wildly gyrating Maryse had become the hit of the evening.

 Paul Castellano would whisper into his man’s ear, and that message would be silently carried across the room and whispered into the ear of Carmine Galante, who would either shake his head or nod in agreement. Once the agenda had been set, members could speak directly with one another.

Paul Castellano would whisper into his man’s ear, and that message would be silently carried across the room and whispered into the ear of Carmine Galante, who would either shake his head or nod in agreement. Once the agenda had been set, members could speak directly with one another.

I found Cal Young on a balcony that overlooked the whole Ballroom. “I still can’t get over it. They all came. If the FBI knew about this they would shit a brick. They’re all here.” Down on the floor, Familial contingents stuck together, either at one table, or a few tables that had been joined together, communicating with other Families through messengers, who would run from table to table, transmitting questions and answers. Initial rules of engagement were being defined. Paul Castellano would whisper into his man’s ear, and that message would be silently carried across the room and whispered into the ear of Carmine Galante, who would either shake his head or nod in agreement. Once the agenda had been set, members could speak directly with one another.

“So, who am I supposed to meet?” Cal shrugged. “Joe told me I’m supposed to meet people here tonight. What’s going on? Haven’t I met enough people already?” Cal laughed, “You mean back at the restaurant? All those handshakes? You were on display, my friend. Like a job interview.” I looked down, and they were all here. The people I had been introduced to at the Villagio Italia: Joe Massino, Sonny Black, Carmine Galante who treated me like a leper, John Gotti, Sammy Gravano, Roy DeMeo, Nino Gaggi, all sitting at tables down on the floor. “Yeah, I thought Dominick was trying to scare me a little. If he introduced me to enough tough-guys I would work harder on his wedding movie. Cal, was there ever really a wedding movie?” He smiled. “You mean, if you had shown up this morning, like you were supposed to, and if Fat Mike brought live doves instead of dead pigeons, and if the ‘Snake’ hadn’t put the kibosh on cameras here tonight? Sure, it would have been nice. It would have gotten Dom’s family off his back. They’re the ones who wanted the wedding movie, not Dom. He was pissed at you because you made him look bad. You told him you’d be there, and you let him down. That pissed him off.” I had to lean a little closer to Cal to hear him clearly. The orchestra seemed a bit louder now. “If you’re asking me if Dom cared one way or another about the movie thing, I’d have to say not really. At the restaurant, you were there to meet people. You were on display, just like tonight. All the talk that night about the wedding movie was just smoke. Dom’s way of not letting you know why you were really there. What you didn’t know couldn’t make you nervous.”

Down on the floor, Steve had returned to our table, carrying a plate of something from the kitchen. Up in the balcony, it was time for Cal to spill the beans. “Look, Dom has got something hanging over his head. I’m not saying what, but something. He might have to do some time. He needs to make some investments that will see his family through while he’s in the can. I told him about you. You’ve got a reputation kid. The movies you make for Dibi, and Star Distributors, they all make money. You’ve got the golden touch, my friend.” I could see Dominick down on the floor, like a master of ceremonies, moving from table to table, shaking hands, laughing, telling jokes, loving every moment. “Dom wants to invest in some movies, but he’s broke. He had to reach out to the shy’s for all of this. So he needed partners. And you met some of them that night at the restaurant. When he goes back to them for the money, and they ask him who is involved, he can say, ‘You met him. Shaun – at the restaurant that night. You shook his hand.’ That’s important. For these guys, everything is done on a handshake.” Maryse was down there dancing with everybody, and people were applauding. Cal was still smiling, surveying the congregation below. “Right now, Dom is out there on the floor, looking for more partners. You’ll be introduced to them. There will be more handshakes. Dom is nobody’s fool. He puts the money together, you make the movies, and I distribute. Everybody makes money, the boys are all happy, and Dom’s family will have some income to see them through. What’s the matter, you don’t like happy endings?” I wanted to ask him what would happen to Fat Mike, but I was afraid to.

Busboys were removing desert plates, and waiters were busy delivering after dinner drinks to tables whose occupants had to speak-up in order to be heard over the orchestra, whose decibel level increased as the night wore on. Out on the dance floor, the alcohol consumption seemed to help the revelers to lose their inhibitions, and they danced with more abandon. The traffic between the tables of businessmen seemed heavier now, and the conversation more animated, mostly serious, but with an occasional outburst of laughter and slaps on the back. The evening was a success for all concerned; those who came to celebrate the marriage of Junior and Angela, and those come to negotiate alliances, in an effort to stop the bickering and in-fighting that had for years plagued this much romanticized fraternity of men, and caused it to drift far from the intentions of its founders. Cal had said that this kind of gathering was unprecedented. Not since the botched Apalachin conference, back in the fifties, had anything like tonight been attempted, much less achieved. And right in the middle of it all was Dominick Cataldo, whose invitations had been answered by all present. They owed it all to him. He was the star of the show. It was his night.

What Cal Young could not know, was that something like this would never happen again. This seemingly amicable amalgam of independent criminal enterprises would soon shatter. Those present would look back on tonight as the last chance for the survival of the brotherhood. The last hope to right the listing ship of this ‘thing of theirs’. The final possibility for peace and lasting prosperity, among men who had seldom know either. It was 1978 and, for La Cosa Nostra, tonight was the last hurrah. 

 Joey Aiuppa from Chicago who, along with Tony Spilotro, had put one bullet into the back of Sam Giancana’s head, followed by five into his face, in the bloody coup that would see him ascend to power.

Joey Aiuppa from Chicago who, along with Tony Spilotro, had put one bullet into the back of Sam Giancana’s head, followed by five into his face, in the bloody coup that would see him ascend to power.

They had come from all over the country. Joey Aiuppa from Chicago who, along with Tony Spilotro, had put one bullet into the back of Sam Giancana’s head, followed by five into his face, in the bloody coup that would see him ascend to power. Both Tony and Joey were sitting at a table, engaged in serious conversation with ‘Tony Ducks’ Corallo, the new boss of New York’s Lucchese Family, who would soon bury his friend and partner Jimmy Hoffa under the end-zone at Giant Stadium. Phil Lombardo was enjoying a joke with Bonanno Boss Carmine Galante, who just six months later would be blown away by his own lieutenants, his signature cigar left dangling from his lifeless lips. The personal representatives from Santo Trafficante in Tampa, and Carlos Marcello in New Orleans were trading jabs with ‘Gaspipe’ Casso, and ‘Little Nick’ Corozzo. A laughing Roy DeMeo sat with his arm around the shoulder of his old friend Nino Gaggi who, five years later, would issue the contract that would see Roy dead, found riddled with bullets in the trunk of his car.

Gambino Boss, ‘Big Paul’ Castellano chatted with ‘Dibi’ DiBernardo, across the table from John Gotti who would kill them both in his bloody rise to power.

Gambino Boss, ‘Big Paul’ Castellano chatted with ‘Dibi’ DiBernardo, across the table from John Gotti who would kill them both in his bloody rise to power.

Gambino Boss, ‘Big Paul’ Castellano chatted with ‘Dibi’ DiBernardo, across the table from John Gotti who would kill them both in his bloody rise to power. Just a few years later, in 1981, ‘Sonny Black’ Napolitano would succumb to bullet wounds at the hands of his pal Nino Gaggi, but tonight they talked baseball. The ‘Bloody Eighties’ would soon take its toll, fewer than half the men in this room surviving to see 1990, but tonight you would never know it to look at them. They seemed so joyful at their combined possibilities, so hopeful for a peaceful and profitable future. Tonight all their problems seemed solvable. Tonight they celebrated La Cosa Nostra.

 ‘Sonny Black’ Napolitano would succumb to bullet wounds at the hands of his pal Nino Gaggi, but tonight they talked baseball.

‘Sonny Black’ Napolitano would succumb to bullet wounds at the hands of his pal Nino Gaggi, but tonight they talked baseball.

The orchestra, once again, increased the volume, and the five hundred guests seemed lost in the comradeship of noisy enjoyment. More people were dancing than talking now and, as the band played the first few notes of a new tune, most eyes in the room turned toward the bandstand. What they heard were the opening notes of a song familiar to them all. A song they would come to adopt as their own. A song that would become the anthem for every wiseguy in the city. And the orchestra’s vocalist stepped up to the microphone and began to sing:

“Start Spreading the news

I’m Leaving today

 

 

A huge cheer engulfed the room, and those who had been dancing, and those who had been negotiating, all instinctively approached the bandstand, and some began to sing along.

 I want to be a part of it

New York, New York

 

More joined-in, and the song was louder now, the need to sing had become contagious. And right in the middle of it was Maryse, her arms linked between Junior and Angela, singing her heart out. The businessmen began singing, some finding each other’s arms and linking up, united in their commonality, lost in the moment. Joe Dogs sang with a purpose and, considering his situation, I wonder if the two Federal Agents outside in their van, heard his joyous noise and joined-in.

I saw Roy DeMeo grab the arm of the waiter who was standing next to him, which became an open invitation for everyone to join in.

I saw Roy DeMeo grab the arm of the waiter who was standing next to him, which became an open invitation for everyone to join in.

In ones and twos, deadly men began to find other deadly men, and arms found arms, and voices joined other voices, and everyone in the room was singing now, forgetting their differences, joined together in the spirit of the moment. The doors to the kitchen opened, and out peered cooks and dishwashers and helpers, all wanting to see what was happening. No one stood alone in this songful celebration. I saw Roy DeMeo grab the arm of the waiter who was standing next to him, which became an open invitation for everyone to join in. Joe Massino and Sonny Black grabbed a nearby bus boy, and stuck him between them with their arms linked to his. They were celebrating themselves, and celebrating their city. Rank melted away, as Capo linked up with Soldier, and Soldier with Lieutenant, and bus boy with Boss, and Bonanno with Colombo, and way off to one side of the room, almost lost in this frenzied celebration was a welcome sight indeed. Standing, linked between ‘Gaspipe’ Casso and a Greg Scarpa, still wearing his black suit, and singing with gusto, was Fat Mike, who had been forgiven by a now magnanimous Dominick Cataldo for sins far worse than mine, and who would now live to see tomorrow.

 

If I can make it here, I’ll make it anywhere

It’s up to you New York, New York”

 

The Seventies would soon come to a close, and the bloody Eighties would begin the carnage that would reduce the rank and file of the Cosa Nostra by half.

The Seventies would soon come to a close, and the bloody Eighties would begin the carnage that would reduce the rank and file of the Cosa Nostra by half.

So this was how it ended, probably the strangest day I’ve known. Dominick Cataldo was now a hero. It would become widely known that he had been responsible for the greatest and most hopeful gathering in the history of this ‘thing of theirs’. His future was assured. His wedding movie had gone up in smoke, but so had many of his worries and, no one, outside of those who were there at the Church that day, would ever discover the awful truth about the pigeons. Cal Young would distribute the movies that I would make, the financing arranged by Dominick and his new network of partners, each of whose hands would find mine, in a gesture of friendship and good commerce. The Seventies would soon come to a close, and the bloody Eighties would begin the carnage that would reduce the rank and file of the Cosa Nostra by half. Some, like Dominick Cataldo and John Gotti, would die in prison, but most would suffer a gruesome demise at the hands of their closest friends and associates, leaving this once proud yet questionable brotherhood in shambles. 

Some, like Dominick Cataldo and John Gotti, would die in prison, but most would suffer a gruesome demise at the hands of their closest friends and associates, leaving this once proud yet questionable brotherhood in shambles.

Some, like Dominick Cataldo and John Gotti, would die in prison, but most would suffer a gruesome demise at the hands of their closest friends and associates, leaving this once proud yet questionable brotherhood in shambles.

But, back on that October night in 1978, at La Mer on Ocean Parkway in Brooklyn, before the Rico Statute, the Witness Protection Program, an increasingly aggressive Justice Department, the Colombian Cartels, and the violent greed of its own membership took such an awful toll; back on that night, with hope for the future of a troubled fraternity that still had teeth in its bite and some spit in its handshake, the two hundred businessmen brought together on the occasion of Dominick Cataldo’s son’s wedding, regardless of their rank, linked arms together and, for the very last time, sang a song.

funeral

*

© 2015 Shaun Costello

 

 

 

 

PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION

PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION

By Shaun Costello

 Forest hills gardens new

This story is excerpted from Shaun Costello’s childhood memoir:

THE LAST TIME I SAW JESUS

Surviving God and Elvis in the Time of ‘Duck and Cover’

My friend Mickey Nolan had parents with a different last name than his, which, considering the divorce rate in the Forest Hills Gardens, was not that unusual. His mom had married a Greek man named Karras, who owned a Greek Restaurant somewhere in Brooklyn. Mrs. Karras was quiet, blond, and very attractive. Mr. Karras was very friendly, always trying to get local kids to try food from his restaurant. It seemed to give him great pleasure to get someone like me to try spinach pie, or lamb kebabs, or bacclavah for the first time, and made him truly ecstatic if you enjoyed it. These were tastes I had never experienced before, and I really liked them. My mother’s cuisine consisted of burned meat and frozen vegetables, so anything new was welcome. Mrs. Karras was a painter who did pastoral water colors and occasionally had exhibitions of her work at their house. On one particular Saturday I went looking for Mickey to play some stick ball and there was a sign outside his house that read, “EXHIBITION TODAY”.

Mrs. Karras was a painter who did pastoral water colors and occasionally had exhibitions of her work at their house.

Mrs. Karras was a painter who did pastoral water colors and occasionally had exhibitions of her work at their house.

There were lots of people, all dressed up, and Eddie’s mom told me that he was up in his room. Eddie was standing at the top of the stairs, frantically waving me up. He told me that he found something in his parent’s closet – something so cool that he was certain that I had never seen anything like it before. We went into his room, and he locked his door. He took a shoebox from under his bed, opened it, and took out a stack of black and white photographs. They were pictures of naked adults doing strange things to each other. When I looked closer I realized that they were pictures of Mickey’s mom, Mr. Karras, and several men, all naked, and involved in kissing, and touching, and caressing each other. Mickey was right. I had never seen anything like this before. I could not even have imagined it. They were mostly of Mickey’s mom being caressed by the men, who all had swollen dicks. So this must be what a boner looks like. Some of the pictures showed Mrs Karras fondling the boners of the naked men. Some even showed her even putting them in her mouth. I was horrified and fascinated simultaneously. With puberty still a year away, the activities graphically displayed in the pictures were a mystery to me. I was only ten years old, but somehow I sensed that what I was seeing was important, a seminal moment in my little life.  I mentioned something to Mickey about his mom looking great in the pictures. I really didn’t know what I was supposed to say. He told me, “What, are you crazy? That’s not my mom. She just has the same color hair, that’s all”. The woman in the pictures was definitely Mickey’s mom, no matter how elaborate his denials. What I wondered was why he was showing them to me.

He took a shoebox from under his bed, opened it, and took out a stack of black and white photographs.

He took a shoebox from under his bed, opened it, and took out a stack of black and white photographs.

On the way out Mrs. Karras was shaking hands with people who were leaving her exhibition, some of whom were carrying framed water colors they had just purchased. “Bye Shaun”, she said. “You behave yourself now”. It seemed that each day something happened to me that made me different than I was the day before. This was one of those days.

                                                                  *

© 2015 Shaun Costello

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